Dead Presidents

Historical facts, thoughts, ramblings and collections on the Presidency and about the Presidents of the United States.

By Anthony Bergen
E-Mail: bergen.anthony@gmail.com
Posts tagged "Running mates"
Asker chrisdelberk Asks:
Clinton/Biden 2016 Thoughts?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

No, definitely not.

After spending eight years as Obama’s Vice President, I’m positive that Biden would have no interest in settling for the Vice Presidency again; he has his eyes set on the White House. If that’s not a possibility, I would not be surprised to see Biden attempt to reclaim his old seat in the U.S. Senate. Biden loved his time in the Senate, he is perhaps more knowledgeable about the inner workings of the Senate than anyone else alive right now, and another stint in the upper chamber of Congress would keep him far more active than continuing as Vice President under another Administration. Biden hasn’t been shy about teasing a possible Presidential run in 2016, but that’s going to be tough (and likely not winnable) if Hillary Clinton indeed runs. However, Biden has also openly said that he has no interest in retiring once his term as Vice President ends on January 20, 2017.

Another big obstacle to a Clinton/Biden ticket in 2016 are the ages of both candidates. Hillary Clinton is already going to face questions about her age if she runs in 2016. If elected, she’ll be the second-oldest President in American history on Inauguration Day 2017; Hillary will be 69 years, 86 days old — just 263 days younger than Reagan was when he was inaugurated. Biden will be 74 years, 61 days on Inauguration Day 2017, so he’d be the oldest President in American history (nearly five years older than Reagan was in 1981) as well as the oldest Vice President in American history (a full three years older than Alben Barkley, who is currently the oldest VP in history and was 71 years, 57 days old when he became Truman’s VP in 1949).

So, Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden will undoubtedly face questions about their age if they run for President in 2016, just as Bob Dole did in 1996 and John McCain did in 2008. In fact, Biden will not only be older than either Dole or McCain was when they ran for the President, but if he were elected President in 2016, he’d be older on Inauguration Day than any other President was upon LEAVING office. Political parties prefer to balance their tickets during Presidential elections geographically, ideologically, experience-wise, and by age. If Hillary or Biden are nominated for President by the Democrats in 2016, the age issue will attempt to be addressed by nominating a running mate who is younger. There’s no way that the Democrats would nominate a 69-year-old President alongside a 74-year-old Vice President. 

McKinley has no more backbone than a chocolate eclair.

Theodore Roosevelt on new President William McKinley, 1897.

In 1900, Roosevelt was elected as McKinley’s running mate, replacing Vice President Garret A. Hobart who had died in office in 1899

Absolutely not. I don’t want anything to do with that son-of-a-bitch.

Gerald Ford, when Ronald Reagan’s name was brought up as a possible Vice Presidential running mate in 1976.

Reagan had challenged and nearly defeated the incumbent President Ford for the 1976 Republican Presidential nomination leaving Ford damaged going into the general election against Jimmy Carter.

Could Mitt Romney have picked a better running mate that would have yielded a win in the general election?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

No.  I said that Romney should choose Paul Ryan as his running mate long before he actually picked him and I still think Paul Ryan was the very best Vice President that Romney could have chosen. 

If I was running Romney’s campaign and I had 100 chances to make changes that I thought would result in a win, I would have picked Paul Ryan as his running mate all 100 times.  Win-or-lose, Ryan was a solid choice for VP.  The Republicans should second-guess a lot of things, but that’s not one of them.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
If you're doing Bergen-2016 who is your runningmate?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

Well, I’ll only be 36 years old — Constitutionally eligible to be President, but just barely — and woefully inexperienced, so I’d need someone who is respected and has a solid resume.  How about Leon Panetta? 

Actually, Panetta would be a damn good running mate for someone (not just in the hypothetical “Anthony for President” silliness).  Panetta served eight terms in Congress, was President Clinton’s OMB director and White House Chief of Staff, and is now President Obama’s Secretary of Defense after serving the first two years of the Obama Administration as CIA Director.  That’s about as solid of a resume for a present-day American public servant as I can think of.  Any Democrat running for President in 2016 should have him on their short list for Vice President.

So, there you go, that’s my ticket: Bergen/Panetta 2016 (although “Bergen/Panetta” kind of sounds like the name of a concentration camp.)

(And the previous sentence is a clear example of why I could never be President.)

This is the fourth and final part of our look at major party tickets for President and Vice President since the enactment of the Twelfth Amendment.  Here is Part IHere is Part IIHere is Part III.

1960: Kennedy/Johnson defeated Nixon/Lodge
Democratic Party ticket
-John F. Kennedy (MA), 43 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
-Lyndon B. Johnson (TX), 52 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Texas/Senate Majority Leader

Republican Party ticket
-Richard Nixon (CA), 47 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (MA), 58 years old, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations

1964: Johnson/Humphrey defeated Goldwater/Miller
Democratic Party ticket
-Lyndon B. Johnson (TX), 56 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Hubert H. Humphrey (MN), 53 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Minnesota

Republican Party ticket
-Barry Goldwater (AZ), 55 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Arizona
-William E. Miller (NY), 50 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from New York

1968: Nixon/Agnew defeated Humphrey/Muskie and Wallace/Lemay
Republican Party ticket
-Richard Nixon (CA), 55 years old, former Vice President of the United States/1960 Republican Presidential nominee
-Spiro Agnew (MD), 49 years old, incumbent Governor of Maryland

Democratic Party ticket
-Hubert H. Humphrey (MN), 57 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Edmund Muskie (ME), 54 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Maine

American Independent Party ticket
-George C. Wallace (AL), 49 years old, former Governor of Alabama
-Curtis LeMay (OH), 61 years old, United States Air Force General

1972: Nixon/Agnew defeated McGovern/Shriver
Republican Party ticket
-Richard Nixon (CA), 59 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Spiro Agnew (MD), 53 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Democratic Party ticket
-George S. McGovern (SD), 50 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from South Dakota
-Sargent Shriver (MD), 56 years old, diplomat/former Peace Corps director
[McGovern originally picked Senator Thomas Eagleton of Missouri as his running mate but dumped him from the ticket in favor of Shriver when it was revealed that Eagleton had been treated for mental illness with electroshock therapy.]

1976: Carter/Mondale defeated Ford/Dole
Democratic Party ticket
-Jimmy Carter (GA), 52 years old, former Governor of Georgia
-Walter Mondale (MN), 48 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Minnesota

Republican Party ticket
-Gerald R. Ford (MI), 63 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Bob Dole (KS), 53 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Kansas

1980: Reagan/Bush defeated Carter/Mondale
Republican Party ticket
-Ronald Reagan (CA), 69 years old, former Governor of California
-George H.W. Bush (TX), 56 years old, former CIA Director/diplomat/former U.S. Representative from Texas

Democratic Party ticket
-Jimmy Carter (GA), 56 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Walter Mondale (MN), 52 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

1984: Reagan/Bush defeated Mondale/Ferraro
Republican Party ticket
-Ronald Reagan (CA), 73 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-George H.W. Bush (TX), 60 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Democratic Party ticket
-Walter Mondale (MN), 56 years old, former Vice President of the United States
-Geraldine Ferraro (NY), 49 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from New York

1988: Bush/Quayle defeated Dukakis/Bentsen
Republican Party ticket
-George H.W. Bush (TX), 64 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Dan Quayle (IN), 41 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Indiana

Democratic Party ticket
-Michael Dukakis (MA), 55 years old, incumbent Governor of Massachusetts
-Lloyd Bentsen (TX), 67 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Texas

1992: Clinton/Gore defeated Bush/Quayle and Perot/Stockdale
Democratic Party ticket
-Bill Clinton (AR), 46 years old, incumbent Governor of Arkansas
-Al Gore (TN), 44 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Tennessee

Republican Party ticket
-George H.W. Bush (TX), 68 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Dan Quayle (IN), 45 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Independent ticket
-Ross Perot (TX), 62 years old, businessman
-James Stockdale (CA), 68 years old, United States Navy Admiral/Medal of Honor recipient

1996: Clinton/Gore defeated Dole/Kemp and Perot/Choate
Democratic Party ticket
-Bill Clinton (AR), 50 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Al Gore (TN), 48 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Republican Party ticket
-Bob Dole (KS), 73 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Kansas/Senate Majority Leader
-Jack Kemp (NY), 61 years old, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development/former U.S. Representative from New York

Reform Party ticket
-Ross Perot (TX), 66 years old, businessman/1996 Independent Presidential candidate
-Pat Choate (OK), 55 years old, economist

2000: Bush/Cheney defeated Gore/Lieberman
Republican Party ticket
-George W. Bush (TX), 54 years old, incumbent Governor of Texas
-Dick Cheney (WY), 59 years old, former U.S. Secretary of Defense

Democratic Party ticket
-Al Gore (TN), 52 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Joe Lieberman (CT), 58 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Connecticut

2004: Bush/Cheney defeated Kerry/Edwards
Republican Party ticket
-George W. Bush (TX), 58 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Dick Cheney (WY), 63 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Democratic Party ticket
-John Kerry (MA), 60 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
-John Edwards (NC), 51 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from North Carolina

2008: Obama/Biden defeated McCain/Palin
Democratic Party ticket
-Barack Obama (IL), 47 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Illinois
-Joe Biden (DE), 65 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Delaware

Republican Party ticket
-John McCain (AZ), 72 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Arizona
-Sarah Palin (AK), 44 years old, incumbent Governor of Alaska

2012: Obama/Biden vs. Romney/Ryan (Election Day: November 6, 2012)
Democratic Party ticket
-Barack Obama (IL), 51 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Joe Biden (DE), 69 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Republican Party ticket
-Mitt Romney (MA), 65 years old, former Governor of Massachusetts/businessman
-Paul Ryan (WI), 42 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from Wisconsin

Part III of our look at the major party tickets for President and Vice President since the enactment of the Twelfth Amendment.  Here is Part I, covering 1804-1832For Part II, covering 1836-1892, click here.

1896: McKinley/Hobart defeated Bryan/Sewall
Republican Party ticket
-William McKinley (OH), 53 years old, Governor of Ohio
-Garret A. Hobart (NJ), 52 years old, Vice Chairman of the Republican National Committee/former president of the New Jersey State Senate

Democratic/Populist Party ticket
-William Jennings Bryan (NE), 36 years old, former U.S. Representative from Nebraska
-Arthur Sewall (ME), 60 years old, shipbuilder/bank president
[Bryan was nominated as President by the Democrats and the Populist Party; Sewall was the Democratic Vice Presidential candidate and the Populist Party nominated former U.S. Representative Thomas E. Watson of Georgia for VP.]

1900: McKinley/Roosevelt defeated Bryan/Stevenson
Republican Party ticket
-William McKinley (OH), 57 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Theodore Roosevelt (NY), 42 years old, incumbent Governor of New York

Democratic Party ticket
-William Jennings Bryan (NE), 40 years old, 1896 Democratic Presidential nominee
-Adlai E. Stevenson (IL), 65 years old, former Vice President of the United States

1904: Roosevelt/Fairbanks defeated Parker/Davis
Republican Party ticket
-Theodore Roosevelt (NY), 46 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Charles Warren Fairbanks (IN), 52 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Indiana

Democratic Party ticket
-Alton B. Parker (NY), 52 years old, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals
-Henry G. Davis (WV), 80 years old, former U.S. Senator from West Virginia

1908: Taft/Sherman defeated Bryan/Kern
Republican Party ticket
-William Howard Taft (OH), 51 years old, U.S. Secretary of War
-James S. Sherman (NY), 53 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from New York

Democratic Party ticket
-William Jennings Bryan (NE), 48 years old, 1896 and 1900 Democratic Presidential nominee
-John W. Kern (IN), 59 years old, former Indiana State Senator

1912: Wilson/Marshall defeated Roosevelt/Johnson and Taft/Sherman
Democratic Party ticket
-Woodrow Wilson (NJ), 55 years old, incumbent Governor of New Jersey
-Thomas Riley Marshall (IN), 58 years old, incumbent Governor of Indiana

Progressive/Bull Moose Party ticket
-Theodore Roosevelt (NY), 54 years old, former President of the United States
-Hiram Johnson (CA), 46 years old, incumbent Governor of California

Republican Party ticket
-William Howard Taft (OH), 55 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-James S. Sherman (NY), 57 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
[Vice President Sherman died a few days before Election Day, so his Electoral College votes went to Columbia University president Nicholas Murray Butler of New York.]

1916: Wilson/Marshall defeated Hughes/Fairbanks
Democratic Party ticket
-Woodrow Wilson (NJ), 59 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Thomas Riley Marshall (IN), 62 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Republican Party ticket
-Charles Evans Hughes (NY), 54 years old, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court/former Governor of New York
-Charles Warren Fairbanks (IN), 64 years old, former Vice President of the United States

1920: Harding/Coolidge defeated Cox/Roosevelt
Republican Party ticket
-Warren G. Harding (OH), 55 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Ohio
-Calvin Coolidge (MA), 48 years old, incumbent Governor of Massachusetts

Democratic Party ticket
-James M. Cox (OH), 50 years old, incumbent Governor of Ohio
-Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), 38 years old, Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy

1924: Coolidge/Dawes defeated Davis/Bryan and La Follette/Wheeler
Republican Party ticket
-Calvin Coolidge (MA), 52 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Charles Gates Dawes (IL), 59 years old, diplomat/Member of the Allied Reparations Commission/former Brigadier General of the United States Army

Democratic Party ticket
-John W. Davis (WV), 51 years old, former U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain/American Bar Association president
-Charles W. Bryan (NE), incumbent Governor of Nebraska

Progressive Party ticket
-Robert M. La Follette, Sr. (WI), 69 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Wisconsin
-Burton K. Wheeler (MT), 42 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Montana

1928: Hoover/Curtis defeated Smith/Robinson
Republican Party ticket
-Herbert Hoover (CA), 54 years old, U.S. Secretary of Commerce
-Charles Curtis (KS), 68 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Kansas

Democratic Party ticket
-Alfred E. Smith (NY), 54 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-Joseph T. Robinson (AR), 56 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Arkansas

1932: Roosevelt/Garner defeated Hoover/Curtis
Democratic Party ticket
-Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), 50 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-John Nance Garner (TX), 63 years old, incumbent Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

Republican Party ticket
-Herbert Hoover (CA), 58 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Charles Curtis (KS), 72 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

1936: Roosevelt/Garner defeated Landon/Knox
Democratic Party ticket
-Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), 54 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-John Nance Garner (TX), 67 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Republican Party ticket
-Alf Landon (KS), 49 years old, incumbent Governor of Kansas
-Frank Knox (IL), 62 years old, Publisher of the Chicago Daily News

1940: Roosevelt/Wallace defeated Willkie/McNary
Democratic Party ticket
-Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), 58 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Henry A. Wallace (IA), 52 years old, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture

Republican Party ticket
-Wendell L. Willkie (IN), 48 years old, lawyer
-Charles L. McNary (OR), 66 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Oregon

1944: Roosevelt/Truman defeated Dewey/Bricker
Democratic Party ticket
-Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), 62 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Harry S. Truman (MO), 60 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Missouri

Republican Party ticket
-Thomas E. Dewey (NY), 42 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-John W. Bricker (OH), 51 years old, incumbent Governor of Ohio

1948: Truman/Barkley defeated Dewey/Warren and Thurmond/Wright
Democratic Party ticket
-Harry S. Truman (MO), 64 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Alben W. Barkley (KY), 70 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Kentucky

Republican Party ticket
-Thomas E. Dewey (NY), 46 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-Earl Warren (CA), 57 years old, incumbent Governor of California

States’ Rights/Dixiecrat ticket
-Strom Thurmond (SC), 45 years old, incumbent Governor of South Carolina
-Fielding L. Wright (MS), 53 years old, incumbent Governor of Mississippi

1952: Eisenhower/Nixon defeated Stevenson/Sparkman
Republican Party ticket
-Dwight D. Eisenhower (NY), 62 years old, General of the Army/Supreme Allied Commander of NATO
-Richard Nixon (CA), 39 years old, U.S. Senator from California

Democratic Party ticket
-Adlai E. Stevenson II (IL), 52 years old, incumbent Governor of Illinois
-John Sparkman (AL), 52 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Alabama

1956: Eisenhower/Nixon defeated Stevenson/Kefauver
Republican Party ticket
-Dwight D. Eisenhower (NY), 66 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Richard Nixon (CA), 43 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Democratic Party ticket
-Adlai E. Stevenson II (IL), 56 years old, 1956 Democratic Presidential nominee/former Governor of Illinois
-Estes Kefauver (TN), 53 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Tennessee

Continuing our look at the major party tickets for President and Vice President since the enactment of the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution in 1804.  For Part I, covering 1804-1832, go here.

1836: Van Buren/Johnson defeated Harrison/Granger and White/Tyler
[No Vice Presidential candidate won the necessary Electoral College votes for election, so the Vice Presidency was decided by the U.S. Senate]
Democratic Party ticket
-Martin Van Buren (NY), 54 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Richard M. Johnson (KY), 56 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from Kentucky

Whig Party ticket
-William Henry Harrison (OH), 63 years old, former soldier (Major General, U.S. Army)/diplomat/territorial politician
-Francis Granger (NY), 44 years old, incumbent member of the New York State Assembly

Whig Party ticket
-Hugh Lawson White (TN), 63 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Tennessee
-John Tyler (VA), 46 years old, U.S. Senator from Virginia

1840: Harrison/Tyler defeated Van Buren/Johnson
Whig Party ticket
-William Henry Harrison (OH), 67 years old, former soldier (Major General, U.S. Army)/diplomat/territorial politician
-John Tyler (VA), 50 years old, Member of the Virginia House of Delegates

Democratic Party ticket
-Martin Van Buren (NY), 58 years old, incumbent President of the United States
[The Democratic Party did not nominated a Vice Presidential candidate in 1840.  Incumbent Vice President Richard M. Johnson was the de facto nominee, but Littleton Tazewell of Virginia and James K. Polk of Tennessee also received Vice Presidential Electoral votes.]

1844: Polk/Dallas defeated Clay/Frelinghuysen
Democratic Party ticket
-James Knox Polk (TN), 49 years old, former Governor of Tennessee
-George Mifflin Dallas (PA), 52 years old, former U.S. Minister to Russia

Whig Party ticket
-Henry Clay (KY), 67 years old, former U.S. Senator from Kentucky
-Theodore Frelinghuysen (NJ), 57 years old, Chancellor of New York University

1848: Taylor/Fillmore defeated Cass/Butler and Van Buren/Adams
Whig Party ticket
-Zachary Taylor (LA), 63 years old, Major General, United States Army
-Millard Fillmore (NY), 48 years old, Comptroller of New York State/former U.S. Representative from New York

Democratic Party ticket
-Lewis Cass (MI), 66 years old, U.S. Senator from Michigan
-William O. Butler (KY), 57 years old, Major General, United States Army

Free Soil Party ticket
-Martin Van Buren (NY), 65 years old, former President of the United States
-Charles Francis Adams (MA), 41 years old, former politician/Editor of the Boston Whig

1852: Pierce/King defeated Scott/Graham
Democratic Party ticket
-Franklin Pierce (NH), 47 years old, Brigadier General of the U.S. Army/former U.S. Senator from New Hampshire
-William Rufus DeVane King (AL), 66 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Alabama and president pro tempore of the United States Senate

Whig Party ticket
-Winfield Scott (VA), 66 years old, Lieutenant General of the United States Army
-William Alexander Graham (NC), 48 years old, U.S. Secretary of the Navy

1856: Buchanan/Breckinridge defeated Frémont/Dayton and Fillmore/Donelson
Democratic Party ticket
-James Buchanan (PA), 65 years old, U.S. Minister to Great Britain
-John C. Breckinridge (KY), 35 years old, former U.S. Representative from Kentucky

Republican Party ticket
-John C. Frémont (CA), 43 years old, former U.S. Senator from California
-William L. Dayton (NJ), 49 years old, former U.S. Senator from New Jersey

American/Know-Nothing Party ticket
-Millard Fillmore (NY), 56 years old, former President of the United States
-Andrew Jackson Donelson (TN), 57 years old, former diplomat/Editor of the Washington Union

1860: Lincoln/Hamlin defeated Breckinridge/Lane, Bell/Everett, and Douglas/Johnson
Republican Party ticket
-Abraham Lincoln (IL), 51 years old, lawyer/former U.S. Representative from Illinois
-Hannibal Hamlin (ME), 51 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Maine

National Democratic Party ticket
-John C. Breckinridge (KY), 39 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States
-Joseph Lane (OR), 59 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Oregon

Constitutional Union Party ticket
-John Bell (TN), 64 years old, former U.S. Senator from Tennessee
-Edward Everett (MA), 66 years old, former U.S. Senator from Massachusetts/former president of Harvard University

Democratic Party ticket
-Stephen A. Douglas (IL), 47 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Illinois
-Herschel V. Johnson (GA), 48 years old, former Governor of Georgia

1864: Lincoln/Johnson defeated McClellan/Pendleton
National Union Party ticket
-Abraham Lincoln (IL), 55 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Andrew Johnson (TN), 55 years old, incumbent Military Governor of Tennessee

Democratic Party ticket
-George B. McClellan (NJ), 37 years old, Major General of the United States Army
-George H. Pendleton (OH), 39 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from Ohio

1868: Grant/Colfax defeated Seymour/Blair
Republican Party ticket
-Ulysses S. Grant (IL), 46 years old, General of the Army/Commanding General of the United States
-Schuyler Colfax (IN), 45 years old, incumbent Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

Democratic Party ticket
-Horatio Seymour (NY), 58 years old, former Governor of New York
-Francis P. Blair, Jr. (MO), 47 years old, former Major General of the U.S. Army/former U.S. Representative from Missouri

1872: Grant/Wilson defeated Greeley/Brown
Republican Party ticket
-Ulysses S. Grant (IL), 50 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Henry Wilson (MA), 60 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Massachusetts

Liberal Republican Party ticket
-Horace Greeley (NY), 61 years old, Editor of the New York Tribune
-B. Gratz Brown (MO), 46 years old, incumbent Governor of Missouri
[Greeley died between Election Day and the meeting of the Electoral College, so the votes he would have received were divided amongst Thomas A. Hendricks (IN), the VP candidate B. Gratz Brown, Charles J. Jenkins (GA), and David Davis (IL)]

1876: Hayes/Wheeler defeated Tilden/Hendricks
[No candidate won the requisite number of Electoral votes needed for election and the disputed 1876 election was decided just two days before Inauguration Day by an Electoral Commission appointed by Congress]
Republican Party ticket
-Rutherford B. Hayes (OH), 54 years old, incumbent Governor of Ohio
-William A. Wheeler (NY), 57 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from Ohio

Democratic Party ticket
-Samuel J. Tilden (NY), 62 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-Thomas A. Hendricks (IN), 57 years old, incumbent Governor of Indiana

1880: Garfield/Arthur defeated Hancock/English
Republican Party ticket
-James Garfield (OH), 48 years old, incumbent U.S. Representative from Ohio
-Chester A. Arthur (NY), 51 years old, former Collector of the Port of New York

Democratic Party ticket
-Winfield Scott Hancock (PA), 56 years old, Major General of the United States Army
-William H. English (IN), 58 years old, author/former U.S. Representative from Indiana

1884: Cleveland/Hendricks defeated Blaine/Logan
Democratic Party ticket
-Grover Cleveland (NY), 47 years old, incumbent Governor of New York
-Thomas A. Hendricks (IN), 65 years old, former Governor of Indiana/1876 Democratic Vice Presidential nominee

Republican Party ticket
-James G. Blaine (ME), 54 years old, former U.S. Secretary of State/former U.S. Senator from Maine/former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
-John A. Logan (IL), 58 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Illinois

1888: Harrison/Morton defeated Cleveland/Thurman
Republican Party ticket
-Benjamin Harrison (IN), 55 years old, former U.S. Senator from Indiana
-Levi P. Morton (NY), 64 years old, former U.S. Minister to France/former U.S. Representative from New York

Democratic Party ticket
-Grover Cleveland (NY), 51 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Allen G. Thurman (OH), 74 years old, diplomat/former U.S. Senator from Ohio

1892: Cleveland/Stevenson defeated Harrison/Reid and Weaver/Field
Democratic Party ticket
-Grover Cleveland (NY), 55 years old, former President of the United States
-Adlai E. Stevenson (IL), 57 years old, former U.S. Representative from Illinois/former Assistant Postmaster General of the United States

Republican Party ticket
-Benjamin Harrison (IN), 59 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Whitelaw Reid (NY), 55 years old, U.S. Ambassador to France

People’s/Populist Party ticket
-James B. Weaver (IA), 59 years old, former U.S. Representative from Iowa
-James G. Field (VA), 66 years old, former Attorney General of Virginia/former Confederate Army General

Now that we know who all of the main players are in the 2012 election, we’re going to break down the major candidates for President and Vice President over the next few days.  First, let’s take a look at the major party tickets for President and Vice President since the enactment of the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution in 1804:

1804: Jefferson/Clinton defeated Pinckney/King
Democratic-Republican Party ticket
-Thomas Jefferson (VA), 61 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-George Clinton (NY), 65 years old, former Governor of New York

Federalist Party ticket
-Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (SC), 58 years old, retired soldier (Major General)/diplomat
-Rufus King (NY), 49 years old, diplomat (U.S. Minister to Great Britain)/former U.S. Senator from New York

1808: Madison/Clinton defeated Pinckney/King
Democratic-Republican Party ticket
-James Madison (VA), 57 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of State
-George Clinton (NY), 69 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

Federalist Party ticket
-Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (SC), 62 years old, retired soldier/diplomat/1804 Federalist Presidential nominee
-Rufus King (NY), 53 years old, diplomat/former U.S. Senator from New York/1804 Federalist Vice Presidential nominee

1812: Madison/Gerry defeated Clinton/Ingersoll
Democratic-Republican Party ticket
-James Madison (VA), 61 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Elbridge Gerry (MA), 68 years old, incumbent Governor of Massachusetts

Federalist Party ticket
-DeWitt Clinton (NY), 43 years old, incumbent Mayor of New York City
-Jared Ingersoll (PA), 63 years old, incumbent Attorney General of Pennsylvania

1816: Monroe/Tompkins defeated King/Howard
Democratic-Republican Party ticket
-James Monroe (VA), 58 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of State
-Daniel D. Tompkins (NY), 42 years old, incumbent Governor of New York

Federalist Party ticket
-Rufus King (NY), 61 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from New York
-John Eager Howard (MD), 64 years old, former U.S. Senator and Governor of Maryland [The Federalist Party did not officially nominate a Vice Presidential candidate in 1816]

1820: Monroe/Tompkins were unopposed in the 1820 election
Democratic-Republican Party ticket
-James Monroe (VA), 62 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Daniel D. Tompkins (NY), 46 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

1824: Adams/Calhoun defeated Jackson/Calhoun, Crawford/Macon, and Clay/Sanford
*The Democratic-Republican Party was the only major political party in 1824 and it resulted in four different tickets emerging from various regions of the country.  No clear winner in the Electoral College led to the election being decided in the House of Representatives in February 1825.  John C. Calhoun originally sought the Presidency, but withdrew to seek the Vice Presidency and was the running mate of both John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson.

Democratic-Republican Party
-John Quincy Adams (MA), 57 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of State
-John C. Calhoun (SC), 42 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of War

Democratic-Republican Party
-Andrew Jackson (TN), 57 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Tennessee
-John C. Calhoun (SC), 42 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of War

Democratic-Republican Party
-William H. Crawford (GA), 52 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
-Nathaniel Macon (NC), 67 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from North Carolina
[Macon replaced Albert Gallatin, who withdrew after being named Crawford’s running mate]

Democratic-Republican Party
-Henry Clay (KY), 47 years old, incumbent U.S. Speaker of the House of Representatives
-Nathan Sanford (NY), 47 years old, incumbent Chancellor of New York

1828: Jackson/Calhoun defeated Adams/Rush
Democratic Party ticket
-Andrew Jackson (TN), 61 years old, retired soldier (Major General)/former U.S. Senator from Tennessee
-John C. Calhoun (SC), 46 years old, incumbent Vice President of the United States

National Republican Party ticket
-John Quincy Adams (MA), 61 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Richard Rush (PA), 48 years old, incumbent U.S. Secretary of the Treasury

1832: Jackson/Van Buren defeated Clay/Sergeant and Wirt/Ellmaker
Democratic Party ticket
-Andrew Jackson (TN), 64 years old, incumbent President of the United States
-Martin Van Buren (NY), 50 years old, U.S. Minister to Great Britain

National Republican Party ticket
-Henry Clay (KY), 55 years old, incumbent U.S. Senator from Kentucky
-John Sergeant (PA), 53 years old, former U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania

Anti-Masonic Party ticket
-William Wirt (VA), 60 years old, former Attorney General of the United States
-Amos Ellmaker (PA), 45 years old, former Attorney General of Pennsylvania

(I forgot to post a Random Fact of the Day yesterday, so I’m making up for it with a bonus fact today.)

On November 7, 1848, Mexican War hero Zachary Taylor defeated Democrat Lewis Cass to become the 12th President of the United States.  Taylor was the second — and last — Whig Party nominee to win a Presidential election.  The first Whig to be elected President was, like Taylor, a career soldier — William Henry Harrison.  The two former Generals had something else in common:  they both died in the White House after a brief term in office.

While Zachary Taylor had a lengthy record of military service, he probably had less political experience than any other President.  The 1848 election was not only the first time Taylor ran for political office; it was the first time he had ever voted!

After President Taylor’s death on July 9, 1850, he was succeeded by Millard Fillmore, a New Yorker who had all of the political experience that Taylor lacked and none of the military experience that Taylor possessed.  Still, the pairing of the two Whig running mates was an odd one that was absent of any personal connection.  In fact, the President-elect and Vice President-elect had never met each other and would remain strangers until after they won the 1848 election.

Asker nedzissou Asks:
Do you think Huntsman would be a good VP? Do you see anyone picking him as a running mate?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

I doubt Huntsman would agree to be anyone’s running mate.  If a Republican other than Huntsman is nominated, I think Huntsman would probably set his sights on the Presidency in 2016 when he’d still be a viable candidate, particularly if he wasn’t someone’s running mate in 2012.

With that said, would he be a good choice for a someone choosing a Vice President?  Absolutely.  He obviously couldn’t be Romney’s running mate because while the country’s voters might be amenable to one Mormon on the ticket, two Mormons would scare off many more voters.  For anyone else, though, Huntsman would provide a great balance to the ticket in many different ways.  He has foreign policy credentials, he’s relatively young, he has experience as an executive, and there are geographical benefits that he would bring to the ticket, as well.

Electorally (and by “Electorally”, I mean within the Electoral College), Huntsman as a Vice Presidential running mate doesn’t bring much to the table simply because Utah is already solid as concrete for the Republicans (the media could comfortably project a Republican victory in Utah today and still be correct in November) and its 6 Electoral votes aren’t a game changer.  If he did agree to be someone’s running mate, though, Huntsman would be a good choice.  A Gingrich/Huntsman ticket might not win the 2012 election, but it would be a formidable matchup for Obama/Biden.    

Asker xtrace Asks:
How often has the Vice Presidential candidate made a significant impact on the outcome of an election, whether to the benefit or deficit of their running-mate? Have you found any potentially formidable pairs in your "opposition research"?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

I think one of the most significant impacts was in the most recent Presidential campaign, 2008.  While I think Barack Obama would have won the 2008 election no matter who John McCain tabbed to be his running mate, I know many Republicans, independents, and undecideds who decided against voting for McCain specifically because of Sarah Palin.  I think the 2008 election would have been much closer if McCain had picked a different running mate because Palin scared a lot of people off.  I don’t believe McCain’s age became a real factor until he chose an obviously unprepared running mate as his potential Vice President.  The Palin choice was just a complete disaster, and it definitely hurt McCain.

As for my “opposition research” (by which you mean who would be a good running mate for a Republican candidate such as Jon Huntsman), I think there are some dangerous combinations that the Democrats would hate facing in 2012.  Jon Huntsman/Fred Thompson, Jon Huntsman/Mike Huckabee, Jon Huntsman/Tom Ridge, Huntsman/Tommy Thompson, Huntsman/Pawlenty — those would all be tough tickets to face.  If I were the Democrats the ticket that would have me shaking in my boots would be Huntsman/Lindsey Graham.  Graham has many of the credentials that Huntsman is lacking with Conservatives and the Republican base and give the ticket geographic balance, as well.