Dead Presidents

Historical facts, thoughts, ramblings and collections on the Presidency and about the Presidents of the United States.

By Anthony Bergen
E-Mail: bergen.anthony@gmail.com
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Posts tagged "Mitt Romney"
Asker Anonymous Asks:
Do you find Kerry and Romney similar? Both are flip-flopping Bay Statters with nice hair and ran in boring elections. If Kerry vs. Romney happened, who would win?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

Yes, I do find them similar, but let me note — despite some of the things that I’ve said about Kerry and despite my vote for Obama over Romney — I do think that both Kerry and Romney are capable and neither would have been a terrible President.  Are they kind of vanilla and do they have reputations for flip-flopping?  Sure.  But both have been successful in the offices that they have held and I wouldn’t have been terrified to see either of them living in the White House because I know that they could have done the job.

What would happen if we had Kerry vs. Romney?  Well, it depends on what they were campaigning for.  If they ran against each other for a U.S. Senate seat from Massachusetts, I think Kerry wins.  Romney DID run for the Senate in Massachusetts, but it was against Ted Kennedy, not John Kerry.  

But if it were a race for the Presidency and you put Romney vs. Kerry to the nation’s voters, I think Romney wins that race.  Romney was a much better campaigner than Kerry was, and I think it would be close in the Electoral College — like 2004 (Bush 286, Kerry 251) — but I definitely think Romney would pull it out.

Could Mitt Romney have picked a better running mate that would have yielded a win in the general election?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

No.  I said that Romney should choose Paul Ryan as his running mate long before he actually picked him and I still think Paul Ryan was the very best Vice President that Romney could have chosen. 

If I was running Romney’s campaign and I had 100 chances to make changes that I thought would result in a win, I would have picked Paul Ryan as his running mate all 100 times.  Win-or-lose, Ryan was a solid choice for VP.  The Republicans should second-guess a lot of things, but that’s not one of them.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
In 2012, Did Obama win or did Romney lose?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

I hate to give the cop-out answer, but it’s truly a bit of both.  Michael Kranish of the Boston Globe wrote a fantastic, in-depth story on Saturday about what went wrong with Mitt Romney’s campaign, and what the Obama campaign did right, particularly with the overwhelming number of staffers Obama had on the ground and offices opened up in key battleground states in comparison to what Romney had. 

Both campaigns had state-of-the-art voter targeting and tracking software, but the Obama campaign learned from mistakes made in 2008 and ensured that there were no glitches on Election Day — a mistake that the Romney campaign paid dearly for on November 6th.

What really stands out in Kranish’s article, however, is the differences in staffing and on the accountability for individual voters that Obama staffers took on during the campaign.  The sheer number of people that Obama had on the ground in certain states (especially Florida and Ohio) is incredible and undoubtedly played a part in his victory.  In some battleground states, Obama offices popped up like Starbucks franchises and that presence allowed the campaign to target the voters they needed to get to the polls.  I mean, I was offered five different jobs by the Obama campaign in October in five distinctly different parts of North Carolina — and that’s a state that Obama lost!  Kranish explains it far better than I can, so I highly suggest checking out his article.

Man, this about sums it all up, doesn’t it?

Anonymous asked:  How much would you pay to be able to laugh at Mitt Romney tonight and keep reminding him about how much he lost by? Good riddance to you Mittens.

Just because I voted for Barack Obama doesn’t mean that I want to see Mitt Romney destroyed, or even hurt.  I don’t agree with Governor Romney’s politics, but I don’t wish him ill and I certainly wouldn’t disrespect him.

This is the problem with American politics — Americans like the person who asked this question.  They are on both sides of the aisle and they are equally horrible for our country.  Last night, I found no glory in the fact that Mitt Romney lost; instead, I was hopeful and happy that Barack Obama won.  I didn’t go to the polls to vote against Mitt Romney; I was there to vote for Barack Obama.

Much like John McCain four years ago, Mitt Romney went out with class last night, and he deserves our respect.  I have never thought that Mitt Romney was a bad man.  I thought Obama would be a better President, but there was never any hatred on my part for Romney.  We can disagree with his politics or the way he campaigns, but there is no reason to look at Mitt Romney as a villain.

Yes, Governor Romney is incredibly wealthy and was probably out-of-touch with “average Americans” like you and me.  But with all of that money, Romney could live a life of leisure and never have to work at anything again.  Instead, what did he do?  He devoted himself to public service.  There’s no question that he loves his family and has a great relationship with them.  He spent a significant amount of time in a leadership role with his church — not just by sitting in a pew every Sunday but by taking a leadership role where he gave up time to help the families and people of his community.  Saving the Salt Lake City Olympics, serving as Governor of Massachusetts, running for President in 2008 and 2012 — none of those things were token jobs where Romney was a figurehead that got the credit while others did the work.  They were all challenges that Romney tackled with hard work and, in each instant, he “left everything on the field”, as he said in his concession speech last night.

Make no mistake about it — running for President is one of the most difficult, exhausting, and thankless journeys that an American can take.  Everyone who runs for President makes tremendous sacrifices, and nobody seeks the Presidency because they are bad people who want to do harm to the United States.  Candidates for the Presidency like Mitt Romney — win or lose — are patriots.  They have a vision for this country and the passion to put themselves on the frontline.  To serve all of us.

Laugh at Mitt Romney?  Taunt him?  No, I would thank Mitt Romney.  I’d tell him that I may not have cast a ballot for him, but that I appreciate the sacrifices he made in order to try to move our country forward.  I’d admit that I disagree with his politics, but that I respect his beliefs and admire his passion for going after what he felt was right.  I’d tell him that I know last night was probably one of the most difficult experiences of his life, but that he conceded with class, he demonstrated a remarkable work ethic throughout the campaign, and that I hoped that my fellow Democrats would have offered their support of him if Obama had lost as seamlessly and earnestly as he offered his support for the President during his concession.

We cannot and will not bridge the divisions in this country if we continue to be ugly towards each other.  Politics alone will not take us where we need to be.  There must be some magnanimity, some cooperation, some compromise between all of us — from the President and the Congress to the State Governors and Legislatures, and right on down to you and me and our neighbors.  “Politics” and “compromise” are dirty words because we drag them through the mud along with anyone connected to those ideas.  That has to stop.  It has to stop between the Democrats and Republicans in Congress, it has to stop between the talking heads on cable news networks, and it has to stop with people who anonymously leave messages on blogs encouraging a celebration over the heartbreaking defeat of someone who put everything on the line to serve his country.  Celebrate Obama’s victory, not Romney’s defeat.  Congratulate Obama and his supporters, but don’t hesitate to appreciate Romney’s work ethic and devotion to service.

We are at our best when all of us — or at least the largest majority of us — are moving forward.  We are at our best when we remember the first word in our nation’s name is “United”.  The idea of a constant conflict pitting Democrats vs. Republicans where one side must win and one side must lose is not progress.  It’s Civil War without violence — but not without casualties.  As someone who knew something about Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant, once said, “Let us have peace.”  We should follow General Grant’s advice and add, “Let us have progress.”  With peace and progress will come prosperity for all of our people.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
How much would you pay to be able to laugh at Mitt Romney tonight and keep reminding him about how much he lost by? Good riddance to you Mittens.
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

Just because I voted for Barack Obama doesn’t mean that I want to see Mitt Romney destroyed, or even hurt.  I don’t agree with Governor Romney’s politics, but I don’t wish him ill and I certainly wouldn’t disrespect him.

This is the problem with American politics — Americans like the person who asked this question.  They are on both sides of the aisle and they are equally horrible for our country.  Last night, I found no glory in the fact that Mitt Romney lost; instead, I was hopeful and happy that Barack Obama won.  I didn’t go to the polls to vote against Mitt Romney; I was there to vote for Barack Obama.

Much like John McCain four years ago, Mitt Romney went out with class last night, and he deserves our respect.  I have never thought that Mitt Romney was a bad man.  I thought Obama would be a better President, but there was never any hatred on my part for Romney.  We can disagree with his politics or the way he campaigns, but there is no reason to look at Mitt Romney as a villain.

Yes, Governor Romney is incredibly wealthy and was probably out-of-touch with “average Americans” like you and me.  But with all of that money, Romney could live a life of leisure and never have to work at anything again.  Instead, what did he do?  He devoted himself to public service.  There’s no question that he loves his family and has a great relationship with them.  He spent a significant amount of time in a leadership role with his church — not just by sitting in a pew every Sunday but by taking a leadership role where he gave up time to help the families and people of his community.  Saving the Salt Lake City Olympics, serving as Governor of Massachusetts, running for President in 2008 and 2012 — none of those things were token jobs where Romney was a figurehead that got the credit while others did the work.  They were all challenges that Romney tackled with hard work and, in each instant, he “left everything on the field”, as he said in his concession speech last night.

Make no mistake about it — running for President is one of the most difficult, exhausting, and thankless journeys that an American can take.  Everyone who runs for President makes tremendous sacrifices, and nobody seeks the Presidency because they are bad people who want to do harm to the United States.  Candidates for the Presidency like Mitt Romney — win or lose — are patriots.  They have a vision for this country and the passion to put themselves on the frontline.  To serve all of us.

Laugh at Mitt Romney?  Taunt him?  No, I would thank Mitt Romney.  I’d tell him that I may not have cast a ballot for him, but that I appreciate the sacrifices he made in order to try to move our country forward.  I’d admit that I disagree with his politics, but that I respect his beliefs and admire his passion for going after what he felt was right.  I’d tell him that I know last night was probably one of the most difficult experiences of his life, but that he conceded with class, he demonstrated a remarkable work ethic throughout the campaign, and that I hoped that my fellow Democrats would have offered their support of him if Obama had lost as seamlessly and earnestly as he offered his support for the President during his concession.

We cannot and will not bridge the divisions in this country if we continue to be ugly towards each other.  Politics alone will not take us where we need to be.  There must be some magnanimity, some cooperation, some compromise between all of us — from the President and the Congress to the State Governors and Legislatures, and right on down to you and me and our neighbors.  “Politics” and “compromise” are dirty words because we drag them through the mud along with anyone connected to those ideas.  That has to stop.  It has to stop between the Democrats and Republicans in Congress, it has to stop between the talking heads on cable news networks, and it has to stop with people who anonymously leave messages on blogs encouraging a celebration over the heartbreaking defeat of someone who put everything on the line to serve his country.  Celebrate Obama’s victory, not Romney’s defeat.  Congratulate Obama and his supporters, but don’t hesitate to appreciate Romney’s work ethic and devotion to service.

We are at our best when all of us — or at least the largest majority of us — are moving forward.  We are at our best when we remember the first word in our nation’s name is “United”.  The idea of a constant conflict pitting Democrats vs. Republicans where one side must win and one side must lose is not progress.  It’s Civil War without violence — but not without casualties.  As someone who knew something about Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant, once said, “Let us have peace.”  We should follow General Grant’s advice and add, “Let us have progress.”  With peace and progress will come prosperity for all of our people.

229 plays
Marvin Gaye,
The Master (1961-1984) (Disc 4)

Marvin Gaye: The Star-Spangled Banner (Live at the 1983 NBA All-Star Game)

•••CHOICES•••

On this day, throughout our nation, something remarkable will take place.  The fact that it happens quadrennially does not diminish its wonder.  In fact, the longer the tradition continues and the more often that it occurs as expected and as designed makes it seem something like a miracle; like an extraordinary experiment that perpetuates itself peacefully and successfully despite the flaws of humanity and the blemishes of our stubborn beliefs.

Across the country, Americans like you and me; men and women; old and young; Democrat, Republican, Independents, and undecideds will stand in lines at churches, in firehouses, in school cafeterias, in community centers built for the public and the normally private garages of local volunteers.  All of the campaigning, the signs, the bumper stickers, the television ads, the newspaper headlines, the e-mails seeking donations, and the chatter with friends, family, and co-workers will be silenced as we step into a polling place and take our ballots.  Some of us will poke holes in paper, some will fill in bubbles like an elementary school quiz, and some will use high-tech touch screens.  What we all will do, however, is participate.  We will make a choice.

That doesn’t seem like it should be all that amazing, does it?  Making a choice?  Yet, it is.  It’s a privilege that Americans are able to claim as a right.  It’s something that many people around the world can’t imagine doing.  It’s a right and privilege that some people still alive today — gray-haired and stooped but very much alive — had to march against hatred and ignorance to gain access to.  Because of where we were born and where we live, we have the ability to make choices today that will have a significant impact on each of our lives.  That is not only a privilege and a right, but a special responsibilty that we have a duty to fulfill.

After all of the money and energy spent on the campaign for President of the United States, the seemingly endless campaigns reach the finish line today.  The candidates have dominated our lives for nearly two years in the most expensive and most visible Presidential campaign in American history.  Yet, this one ends exactly like the 56 Presidential campaigns that preceded it — with people like you and me making a choice.

Despite the divisive nature of politics, we go to the polls today because “politics” is not really a dirty word.  Instead, it’s the system we use to find solutions.  As fractured as our nation is, there is something unifying in the collective act of streaming into polling places across the continent and making the choice we believe is best for our country.  Tense disagreements and heightened emotions are calmed by the singular majesty of millions of individual Americans exercising their right, responsibility, and privilege of voting.  The loud arguments, the angry words, and the destructive vitriol hurled at political opponents in debates, on cable news networks, and on partisan internet sites is quieted by the dignified power of casting your ballot.

Our country has many problems and our political leaders can be difficult, disappointing, and seemingly defeatist, but that’s why there is such beauty in what we do today. 

Yes, there is something beautiful and inspiring about Election Day, and it is us.

On another Election Day — Super Tuesday, February 5, 2008, which seems like a lifetime ago — then-Senator Barack Obama told a crowd of supporters, “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.  We are the change that we seek.”  Whether you support President Obama or Governor Romney, that is still the case.  There have been a lot of problems in the United States of America lately, and there will continue to be problems tomorrow.  But today is the day where we can start solving those problems.  The solution lies with us.  We have the power to change things and set things right because that amazing privilege/right/responsibility — the ability to make a choice — belongs to us. 

For all of the ugliness we see and experience in this country, there is definitely beauty and bliss in the ballot.  We can continue to scream at one another and cast shadows over our nation’s future because of petty political differences, or we can make righteous choices that benefit the most Americans possible.  We can choose leaders who seek solutions rather than those who think our political system is based around a scoreboard and that they only win if the other side loses.  The American experiment is a not a competition between liberals and conservatives, so on this day where we continue our remarkable history of peacefully making important choices, let’s remember that our country doesn’t progress unless we all move forward together. 

Choices are marvelous things.  Whether you see your ability to make a choice as a privilege, a right, or a responsibility, remember that it is also a gift of power.  Use that power.  Make a choice, make a difference, go vote, and let’s move our nation forward.  Together.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Since Kid Rock is Romney/Ryan's most notable celebrity supporter shouldn't they use Bawitdaba as their official campaign song? I really just want to hear that song start playing at a crowded convention and Romney and Ryan come out headbanging to it to the shock and awe of an entire nation.
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

If they were to use Kid Rock and wanted some real “shock and awe”, they should go old-school and use "Balls In Your Mouth" from the Polyfuze Method.  It would be the greatest thing to ever happen to America.

Alright, kids, let’s see if this Smart-Ass Commentary works for a debate.  It worked well during President Obama’s State of the Union Address and during the Republican and Democratic Conventions, but I can’t promise that this experiment won’t be a total trainwreck.

It’s the second of three Presidential debates between President Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.  This is a town hall format from Hofstra University, alma mater of my favorite publicist in the whole wide world, Joe Villa of the WWE (that’s one WWE reference and I think you should take a shot every time I make one).  Candy Crowley of CNN is moderating.

President Obama needs a good showing tonight because Governor Romney kicked the ever-loving shit out of him in the first debate.  I thought Joe Biden won the Vice Presidential debate, but it was close and Paul Ryan came across well, in my opinion.  This is really, truly, genuinely, seriously, authentically, legitimately, hugely important for Obama. 

And here we go…it’s clobberin’ time (take a shot).

•After moderating this debate, Candy Crowley will be heading back to the North Pole so she can get ready to deliver everyone’s toys.
•They switched things up — Mitt with the blue tie tonight and Barack with the red one.  How will that affect their performances???
•(It won’t.  It’s just a fucking tie.)
•You know, if they really wanted to mix things up, instead of a third debate with one another, the candidates should have to speak at one of their opponent’s political rallies.  That would be awesome to watch, especially if they did it randomly so the audience didn’t know ahead of time that they were getting Obama instead of Romney or vice versa.
•I wish we could hear what they say during their introductory handshake.
•Wouldn’t it be smart to talk trash at that time or try to throw the other guy off?
•Seriously, imagine how confused and off his game Obama would be if Romney ended the handshake by saying something like, “How about trying to keep it real this time, my nigga”.  Obama would be stunned.
•Oh man, how am I going to keep this from being 40,000 words when I want to mock everyone who asks a question?
•At least that 20-year-old kid in his grandpa’s suit wasn’t nervous or anything.  Ninety minutes of awkward people asking boring questions.  This will be awesome.  And by “awesome” I mean “stab me, please”.
•President Obama looks like he’s getting thinner, doesn’t he?  He’s starting to look fragile.
•Romney seems like he’s feeling confident because of the last debate.  He’s going to just start putting his arm around Candy Crowley and begin singing Pat Boone songs.
•Another nervous audience member. Dude was shaking like my head when the President begins another boring, uninspiring answer.
•These debates should be like that old pop-up video show on VH1 but with instant fact-checking from reliable sources.
•Obama: “That’s what we’re going to do in the next four years.”
Romney: “But that’s not what you’ve done in the last four years.  That’s the problem.” — That is a killer line from Romney and Obama needs to combat that instantly, every single time, by mentioning the do-nothing, record-low-approval-rating, obstructionist Congress.  Obama isn’t, so Romney is winning the message war.
•Romney is controlling this debate.  He’s controlling the arguments.  YOU ARE THE INCUMBENT, MR. PRESIDENT…TRY TO PRETEND YOU ARE IN CHARGE!
•I’m getting very frustrated.  It’s like Obama doesn’t even care.
•Obama: “I’m used to being interrupted.” — ASSERT YOURSELF! LBJ wouldn’t have allowed that.  Nixon wouldn’t have allowed that.  Reagan and Clinton wouldn’t have allowed that.  You are the President, assert yourself and take control.
•27 minutes in and Obama finally points out that Congress has hindered him. 
•I hate to have to keep saying this, but if I’m going to be an honest observer, Romney is more focused.  He explains what he wants to say better and with more confidence.  He even seems more passionate and empathetic. 
•Obama is a bit more aggressive right now, but he’s not connecting.  I never thought I’d see the day where Mitt Romney would be connecting with people better than Barack Obama.
•Oh, well hello, Catherine Benton.  I’m Anthony.  Feel free to Facebook me if you want to talk about the issues, if you know what I mean…
•It would be hilarious if Romney talked about his respect for women or gender equality by saying, “The President had an influential grandmother in his life, and I looked up to my 57 grandmothers and loved each one equally, just like my grandfather did.”
•Now this is where Obama shines — the arguments about Planned Parenthood and health care choices for women.  That’s where you get the passion that Romney has for job creation.
•Holy shit, an audience member with an interesting question!  The lady who asked Romney about the differences between he and President Bush deserves a gold star. 
•And Romney can’t run away from Bush quickly enough.
•Obama wants to kiss that lady on the mouth for letting him point out that Bush left him a steaming pile of dogshit when he left the White House.
•Smooth move by Obama to contrast Bush and Romney with examples that actually made Bush look MORE reasonable.  That was the best thing Obama has done in two debates so far.
•When the black dude in the audience said that he voted for Obama in 2008 and wanted to know why he should vote for him in 2012, do you think it would have been controversial if Obama just blurted out, “BECAUSE I’M BLACK!”?  I think Drudge would have had a problem with that.
•It’s taken 90 minutes of the 1st debate and nearly 60 minutes of the 2nd debate, but President Obama seems to have finally realized that he should try to get himself reelected.
•I have to be honest with you guys; it’s difficult for me to be a smart-ass with these debates because they are just too important.  I get wrapped up in being focused on what the candidates are actually saying and it’s hard for me to try to write something funny.
•Obama getting pissed off at Romney about the Libyan attack was a strong moment.
•Oh, hey, what’s up, mamacita?
•Goddamn, this is a long 90 minutes, isn’t it?
•If I was in a Presidential debate, I would make a completely ridiculous claim about my opponent just so he’d have to deny it.  I’d say things like, “Governor Romney, is it or is it not true that you eat kitten paws for lunch every Thursday?” or “Mr. President, it’s been said that you exercise by open-hand slapping newborn babies in their little faces whenever you can’t get to a basketball court, correct?”
•The President is just rambling.  I listened to every word he said and I couldn’t even tell you what he was talking about.  No spirit, no passion.
•We’re getting close to the end, thankfully.
•It’s pretty wild to think that Romney would be the third-oldest President to ever be inaugurated if he’s elected.  He looks younger than half of the Presidents inaugurated at a younger age than he will be on January 20th.
•Speaking of January 20th — Inauguration Day — that’s my birthday, so you might want to start shopping and getting your gifts for me.  I’ll go ahead and wait if you need to write that down real quick……got it?  Good.
•Solid final question to lead into a final statement.
•Romney once again showed some passion with his answer.
•In debates, I think Obama’s cadence when he speaks hurts him.  It makes it seem as if he is stammering at times when it’s just how he speaks.
•Yay, it’s over.

Final thoughts:  I think Romney won this debate, too.  It wasn’t a massacre like the first debate and Obama had some strong points, particularly in the middle part of the debate.  For me, though, it keeps coming back to passion.  Romney seems like he wants it more, seems like he cares more.  I know how important it is to Obama, but he’s just not connecting.  He’s not connecting with ME.  If Barack Obama isn’t connecting with ME, I think he’s in trouble.  Mitt Romney is a better debater and, astonishingly, he might actually be a better public speaker.  There was more aggression out of Obama tonight, but there were still too many moments where he let Romney run through him or where he looked to the moderator to save him. 

One debate to go and 20 days to Election Day and I have no idea who is going to be our next President.

What a shame.  It looks like Mitt Romney’s vicious war against Big Bird is already taking its toll on the beloved character. 
While his sign (top-notch craftsmanship, by the way; I wonder if it was written with those awesome markers that smell like blueberries) calls for a crackdown on Wall Street, I can’t help but see Big Bird in this raggedy-ass condition and think that there might be a different type of crack down on Sesame Street, if you know what I mean.
With Big Bird at the center of Mitt Romney and the GOP’s attacks, his future is undoubtedly the focus of the 2012 Presidential campaign, as it should be.  When we go to the polls on November 6th, what is truly the most important issue to the people of the United States?  Affordable health care for all Americans?  True economic recovery and more jobs?  The survival of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security?  Lowering our dependence on foreign oil while finding clean and sustainable forms of energy?  Reducing the deficit, cutting spending, and balancing the budget?
NO!
What is important is that Big Bird can continue roaming pants-less around ghetto-ass Sesame Street (seriously, when you’re older and check Sesame Street out, it’s surprising how run-down the ‘hood they live in is; I mean, Oscar lives in a fucking garbage can).  What is important is that Big Bird can keep hanging out with Mr. Snuffleupagus, the world’s first transgender wooly mammoth (It’s okay, Snuffy, we accept you and your fake Revlon eyelashes from Walgreens and think that you made a good choice with hot pink for your lipstick).
Most of us probably grew up watching Sesame Street.  Do we want Big Bird out on the street turning tricks because Mitt Romney thinks that is where he belongs?  What’s next?  If elected President, will Romney continue the Thanksgiving tradition and pardon a turkey at the White House only to barbecue Big Bird?  If you’re a Thanksgiving guest at the Romney home and they serve a 7-foot-tall roasted “chicken”, you’ll know it’s too late.
After Big Bird, where will it stop?  Oscar the Grouch thrown into anger management?  The Cookie Monster put on a low-carb diet?  Will The Count be put in therapy to control his rampant OCD?  If Mitt Romney is elected and he is able to launch his unrestricted and punitive war against Sesame Street, all of these things will happen and more.  Bert and Ernie, after all the years and all this progress, will never be able to get married because of the limitations for same-sex couples in this country; they’ll have to move to Europe.  Do you want to live in a world where Elmo is captured, lined up against a wall, and summarily executed?  Okay, maybe that one is okay, but the rest of the stuff sucks.
In closing, I’ll turn the keyboard over to one of Sesame Street's legends…
….here is Grover:
"Thank you, Anthony.  I love your website and think you are brilliant.  Also, handsome.  By the way, I was named after a President!  Anyway, as you know this has been very scary for all of us on Sesame Street.  That is why I am packing my shit and getting out of here.  If Mitt Romney is elected I want to be sure I am not on Sesame Street when the arrests and genocide begins.  There are many problems in this country but I think everyone should base their vote for President on what will or will not happen to fuzzy Muppets that humans put their hands inside in order to entertain and teach children.
Wars come and go.  The economy goes up and down.  But Muppets are what drive this country.  The very thought that we might be in danger has led to drastic measures.  We shall fight this from the outside!  If Mitt Romney wins the election, I will personally lead a squadron of Muppets into Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood where we will burn and loot the Land of Make Believe.  To send a message to the federal government, we will take one of its employees as a hostage — Mr. Rogers’ overly intrusive mail carrier, Mr. McFeely.
Please, America, do the right thing on the Election Day so that we do not have to do the wrong thing afterward.  Long live my friends on Sesame Street except for Oscar the Grouch because he is kind of a prick.  When you go to the polls four weeks from today, think about what is really important and what really matters when choosing a President — do we need a commander-in-chief who will safeguard the nation from terror, expand the economy while adding more jobs, and manage the nation truthfully and faithfully as the Constitution requires?  Or do we need a President who loves Big Bird?  The choice belongs to you.”

What a shame.  It looks like Mitt Romney’s vicious war against Big Bird is already taking its toll on the beloved character. 

While his sign (top-notch craftsmanship, by the way; I wonder if it was written with those awesome markers that smell like blueberries) calls for a crackdown on Wall Street, I can’t help but see Big Bird in this raggedy-ass condition and think that there might be a different type of crack down on Sesame Street, if you know what I mean.

With Big Bird at the center of Mitt Romney and the GOP’s attacks, his future is undoubtedly the focus of the 2012 Presidential campaign, as it should be.  When we go to the polls on November 6th, what is truly the most important issue to the people of the United States?  Affordable health care for all Americans?  True economic recovery and more jobs?  The survival of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security?  Lowering our dependence on foreign oil while finding clean and sustainable forms of energy?  Reducing the deficit, cutting spending, and balancing the budget?

NO!

What is important is that Big Bird can continue roaming pants-less around ghetto-ass Sesame Street (seriously, when you’re older and check Sesame Street out, it’s surprising how run-down the ‘hood they live in is; I mean, Oscar lives in a fucking garbage can).  What is important is that Big Bird can keep hanging out with Mr. Snuffleupagus, the world’s first transgender wooly mammoth (It’s okay, Snuffy, we accept you and your fake Revlon eyelashes from Walgreens and think that you made a good choice with hot pink for your lipstick).

Most of us probably grew up watching Sesame Street.  Do we want Big Bird out on the street turning tricks because Mitt Romney thinks that is where he belongs?  What’s next?  If elected President, will Romney continue the Thanksgiving tradition and pardon a turkey at the White House only to barbecue Big Bird?  If you’re a Thanksgiving guest at the Romney home and they serve a 7-foot-tall roasted “chicken”, you’ll know it’s too late.

After Big Bird, where will it stop?  Oscar the Grouch thrown into anger management?  The Cookie Monster put on a low-carb diet?  Will The Count be put in therapy to control his rampant OCD?  If Mitt Romney is elected and he is able to launch his unrestricted and punitive war against Sesame Street, all of these things will happen and more.  Bert and Ernie, after all the years and all this progress, will never be able to get married because of the limitations for same-sex couples in this country; they’ll have to move to Europe.  Do you want to live in a world where Elmo is captured, lined up against a wall, and summarily executed?  Okay, maybe that one is okay, but the rest of the stuff sucks.

In closing, I’ll turn the keyboard over to one of Sesame Street's legends…

….here is Grover:

"Thank you, Anthony.  I love your website and think you are brilliant.  Also, handsome.  By the way, I was named after a President!  Anyway, as you know this has been very scary for all of us on Sesame Street.  That is why I am packing my shit and getting out of here.  If Mitt Romney is elected I want to be sure I am not on Sesame Street when the arrests and genocide begins.  There are many problems in this country but I think everyone should base their vote for President on what will or will not happen to fuzzy Muppets that humans put their hands inside in order to entertain and teach children.

Wars come and go.  The economy goes up and down.  But Muppets are what drive this country.  The very thought that we might be in danger has led to drastic measures.  We shall fight this from the outside!  If Mitt Romney wins the election, I will personally lead a squadron of Muppets into Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood where we will burn and loot the Land of Make Believe.  To send a message to the federal government, we will take one of its employees as a hostage — Mr. Rogers’ overly intrusive mail carrier, Mr. McFeely.

Please, America, do the right thing on the Election Day so that we do not have to do the wrong thing afterward.  Long live my friends on Sesame Street except for Oscar the Grouch because he is kind of a prick.  When you go to the polls four weeks from today, think about what is really important and what really matters when choosing a President — do we need a commander-in-chief who will safeguard the nation from terror, expand the economy while adding more jobs, and manage the nation truthfully and faithfully as the Constitution requires?  Or do we need a President who loves Big Bird?  The choice belongs to you.”

Possibly, but there’s an important factor to that youth opposition that a lot of these “slacktivists” who use social networking and Occupy-type protests to make a lot of noise don’t recognize:  their opposition only means something if they vote. 

See, Romney’s supporters will vote on Election Day.  If General Petraeus was a candidate, his supporters would vote on Election Day.  But the young people and many of the minorities who oppose Romney?  It’s a chore to get many of them out to vote.  If you’re reading this website or Politico and oppose Romney, chances are that you are politically active and will vote.  Yet, I would imagine that most of those young people who casually watch parts of the debates and Tweet about how Romney is part of the 1% will scream and yell and protest the GOP, but they won’t necessarily go vote on Election Day.  And, when push comes to shove, that’s all that matters.

Just to compare and contrast Romney with a hypothetical candidacy by Petraeus, while I do think a lot of the younger people who opposed the war would oppose General Petraeus, I think it would be offset by seniors (who love a leader like Petraeus) and veterans, including a lot of the younger veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan while General Petraeus was the commander of our forces.  General Petraeus would motivate a lot more supporters to get to the polls than Romney, he would definitely earn a lot more crossover votes than Romney, and any opposition would be offset by gains in areas that Romney wouldn’t be as successful.  General Petraeus would be a formidable candidate for President, no matter what party he represented or who he faced in the campaign.

I don’t know, I thought Romney beat Obama pretty clearly.  Obama seemed off from the beginning and Romney was solid.  Remember, with debates, a big part of the game is how you say something and how you come across.

Plus, I noticed that Romney has this way of reacting to what Obama says that really works well with the splitscreen for some reason and just completely neutralizes the President’s argument.  Obama will say something and Romney will look at him with a face that basically says, “Aw, good try, pal.”  And it’s killer because Romney’s reaction doesn’t come across as mean or petulant or anything.  It’s more like the look that your coach or your dad would give you if you tried really hard at something and just couldn’t get it done.  If I was Romney’s campaign manager, I would have Romney play the “Listen, slugger, we’re all really proud of you what you tried to do and maybe it’ll work out someday” card until Election Day because it totally works for him.

Hey, Governor Romney, did you hear that?  In case you missed it, it’s the quote right above these sentences.  You know, the one by the Mormon former Governor who should be President.  No…no, not the one in the mirror — the one that is completely reasonable and intelligent and actually gives me hope that we can actually heal the divisions in our country.