Dead Presidents

Historical facts, thoughts, ramblings and collections on the Presidency and about the Presidents of the United States.

By Anthony Bergen
E-Mail: bergen.anthony@gmail.com
Posts tagged "Electoral College"
Asker chrisdelberk Asks:
What do you think of the possibility of a Tea Party 3rd candidate in 2016?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

If it happened, it would automatically hand the election over to the Democrats. A third party candidate would split the non-Democratic vote, and neither the mainstream Republican candidate or the third party Tea Party candidate would be able to garner the votes needed to win many, if any, states. It would result in a Democratic landslide in the Electoral College, and it would be catastrophic for the GOP.

An example of what this would look like is the 1912 election when incumbent President William Howard Taft, a Republican, was challenged by his mentor and predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt, for the GOP nomination. Since Taft was President and the President is head of the party, Taft controlled enough delegates to hold on to the Republican nomination despite Roosevelt’s popularity nationally and scores of dissatisfied Republicans. When Taft was renominated, Roosevelt bolted from the party and became the Progressive Party (or “Bull Moose” Party) nominee. The Taft/Roosevelt split also fractured the Republican Party and the scattered any possible majority for President Taft or Roosevelt. It also drove many progressive Republicans towards the Democratic candidate, Woodrow Wilson, who pledged a progressive platform. Wilson hadn’t even served two years as Governor of New Jersey at that point (his only experience in elective politics), but the drama within the Republican Party during the 1912 election guaranteed Wilson’s victory so far out that Wilson spent much of the final weeks of the campaign working to elect Democratic members of Congress to work with him once he was elected President instead of focusing on his own campaign.

The final result was an Electoral College and popular vote bloodbath. In the Electoral College, Wilson won 435 votes to Roosevelt’s 88 and Taft’s 8. Wilson won 42% of the popular vote while Roosevelt won 27% and Taft won 23%. It would be very difficult for a third party candidate to win a Presidential election — not impossible, but very difficult. For a third party candidate to win, that party would likely need to be on the ballot in two or three Presidential elections first in order to gain exposure, complete ballot access nationally, and win the confidence of an electorate which has become conditioned to vote for one of two major parties. A third party candidate’s success in a Presidential election would also likely require a solid foundation on the local, state, and federal love, so that there is a base of supporters, surrogates, and other elected officials to advocate the party and its candidate. A third party’s success wouldn’t come from winning one Presidential election; it would come from electing members of Congress, Governors, local officials, and then winning a Presidential election. Like I said, it’s not impossible, but it is very difficult — and it is way harder now than it was in 1912 when Theodore Roosevelt was just a few years removed from a very popular Presidency and one of the most famous people in the world.

Finally — and this is the most important thing pertaining to your question — a Tea Party candidate absolutely can not and will not ever win a national election. A third party candidate winning a Presidential election is unlikely but not impossible; a Tea Party candidate winning a Presidential election is impossible. There is no way to make the Electoral College math work for a Tea Party candidate on the national level. And if the Tea Party did run a third party candidate for President, that would be as a major protest against the mainstream Republican Party. It would sabotage the party’s shot at that particular election, and possibly even fatally split the party on a national level. Tea Party candidates can win (and have won) seats in Congress, but a national election victory isn’t even slightly possible. The GOP would do everything it could to prevent a third party candidate from the Tea Party running for President.  

Simple question: do you think LBJ would've won in 1968? I think he could have despite the turbulence surrounding his presidency simply because people knew he was a leader. And also, the war in Vietnam hadn't quite hit it's peak though it was close. I think that Americans would rather want the devil they know than the one they don't, especially in wartime. Anyways, what's your opinion?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

I agree — I think LBJ would have won in ‘68 if he had run. First of all, Hubert Horatio Humphrey, of all people, almost pulled off the victory over Richard Nixon in 1968. Humphrey lost the popular vote by a margin of just over 500,000 votes — in an election where George Wallace won nearly 10 million votes. Despite his Civil Rights accomplishments, I think Johnson would have neutralized Wallace in some of those Southern states. In fact, it’s very possible that a heavyweight like LBJ in the race would have kept George Wallace from launching a bid as serious as he actually did in 1968. Wallace won 46 Electoral votes (all of them being states of the Deep South) and I don’t think that would have happened with LBJ in the race.

Wallace was a big factor in the race, but another big factor was the battle for the Democratic nomination and the turbulence surrounding the primaries, RFK’s assassination, and the battles between Chicago police and anti-war protesters outside of the Democratic National Convention. If LBJ had been the candidate, there would have been no primary fight, and the DNC would have been much more disciplined. There definitely still would have been anti-war protests, but instead of seeming to add to the chaos of the Democrats’ nomination process, it would have come across differently.

And the biggest difference would have been the difference between Lyndon Baines Johnson on the campaign trail and Hubert H. Humphrey on the campaign trail. On television, LBJ often came across wooden and uninspiring, but he was something altogether different while campaigning. More importantly, LBJ wouldn’t have rolled over and just let Nixon get away with any Nixonian dirty tricks. LBJ could play just as dirty, and he would have if it meant the difference between four more years and a forced retirement. LBJ was the incumbent President of the United States and the head of the Democratic Party; he controlled the party apparatus would have known who to use the power of his office and his power of the Democratic Party to propel him to victory if it was kept close.

It definitely would have been closer than the 1964 election; LBJ wouldn’t have cruised to a landslide over Nixon in 1968 like he did over Barry Goldwater four years earlier, but I do think LBJ would have beat Nixon. In the election that we did get — a three-way race between Nixon, Humphrey, and Wallace — the Electoral College results were Nixon 301, Humphrey 191, Wallace 46 (270 votes needed to win). Nixon won the popular vote in 1968 over Humphrey by only a few hundred thousand more votes than Kennedy beat him in 1960 (one of the narrowest victories in American history) and George Wallace claimed 9.9 million votes. As I said, in my opinion, if LBJ had run in ‘68, Wallace either wouldn’t have run or he wouldn’t have been able to get ballot access in all 50 states. Either way, he wouldn’t have won 9.9 million votes and I don’t think he would have won any of the five states that he did actually win in ‘68 (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi). LBJ would have built a powerful voter registration and get out the vote organization in those Southern states with large African-American populations whose right to vote was signed into law and protected three years earlier by LBJ. I think that those new voters, in addition to the Democrats who remained Democratic voters in the South despite LBJ’s Civil Rights policy, would have put those states in the Democratic column. Wallace also won one of North Carolina’s 13 Electoral votes in ‘68.

If it was just LBJ vs. Nixon, I think LBJ would have won all of the states that Humphrey won (Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia) as well as the states that Wallace won (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi). I also think that LBJ would have won 11 of the 32 states that Nixon won majorities in over Humphrey (Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia). In many of the 32 states that Nixon won in the actual 1968 election, his margin of victory was slim and Wallace’s removal from the equation likely would have swung more votes into the Democratic column than the Republican, resulting in a swing of those 11 states. The popular vote margin would still be pretty close, but LBJ would win majorities in most of the major states (those with the most Electoral College votes). In a straight LBJ vs. Nixon matchup in 1968, I think the Electoral College result would be: LBJ 381, Nixon 157.

And, yes, this question motivated me to actually go back and re-figure the 1968 Presidential election’s Electoral College map state-by-state. Don’t say I never did anything for you guys.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
George W Bush considers himself a Texan even though he wasn't born there. Do presidents have to declare exactly what state that they are from when they are running? are there other presidents besides W who claimed a different state than where they were born?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

Good question!

First of all, let me set the table a bit.  The Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution, which sets forth the process for the election of the President and Vice President (and attempts to explain the Electoral College), instructs Presidential Electors to cast a separate ballot for the President and Vice President and prohibits Electors from casting both votes for candidates who reside in the same state as the Elector.  To break that down, basically, that means that if I was an Elector, I couldn’t cast my ballot for a President and Vice President who, like me, live in California.  At least one of my votes would have to go to someone residing in a different state.

Some take that to mean that the President and Vice President can’t be elected if their official residency is the same state.  In actuality, they can reside in the same state, but Electoral votes are the ticket to the White House, so nobody wants to even risk the possibility of having even just one or two Electoral votes disqualified, which is what would happen if an Elector did cast ballots for a President and Vice President who both resided in the Electors state.  In 2000, Dick Cheney established Wyoming as his official residency once he was named as George W. Bush’s running mate. Although Bush and Cheney both lived in Texas at the time, Cheney had a home in Wyoming, had represented Wyoming in Congress, and establishing official residences in different states protected them from any possible complications in the Electoral College.

Anyway, back to the main point of your question, yes, Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates declare their official state of residency when they seek election.  I’m not positive when or how they do it — it could be when they file their paperwork to run, it could be as simple as it being where they are registered to vote.  I’m not sure about the particulars.  But there have been plenty of Presidents whose official state of residency was different from their state of birth.

And, since I’m here to give you as much information, as possible, whether you specifically ask for it or not, here are those Presidents:

Andrew Jackson: Born in South Carolina; Represented Tennessee throughout his political career and is buried there.
William Henry Harrison: Born in Virginia; Appointed to territorial government positions in the Northwest Territory and Indiana Territory early in his political career; Represented Ohio during the last half of his political career and at the time of his election as President; Buried in Ohio
James K. Polk: Born in North Carolina; Represented Tennessee throughout his political career; Buried in Tennessee
Zachary Taylor: Born in Virginia; Stationed throughout the country during his long military career; Officially resided in Louisiana at the time of his election as President; Buried in Kentucky
Abraham Lincoln: Born in Kentucky; Represented Illinois throughout his political career; Buried in Illinois
Jefferson Davis (Confederate President): Born in Kentucky; Represented Mississippi throughout his political career; Buried in Virginia 
Andrew Johnson: Born in North Carolina; Represented Tennessee throughout his political career; Buried in Tennessee
Ulysses S. Grant: Born in Ohio; Officially resided in Illinois at the time of his Presidential election; Buried in New York
Chester A. Arthur: Born in Vermont; Spent nearly his entire adult life working and living in New York which was his official state of residency when he was elected Vice President and succeeded to the Presidency upon Garfield’s assassination; Buried in New York
Grover Cleveland: Born in New Jersey; Represented New York throughout his political career; Buried in New Jersey
Benjamin Harrison: Born in Ohio; Represented Indiana throughout his political career; Buried in Indiana
Woodrow Wilson: Born in Virginia and raised in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina; Represented New Jersey when elected to the only two political positions he ever campaigned for; Buried in Washington, D.C.
Calvin Coolidge: Born in Vermont; Represented Massachusetts throughout his political career; Buried in Vermont
Herbert Hoover: Born in Iowa and grew up there and in Oregon; Spent nearly a quarter-century working as a mining engineer and then relief organizer around the world; Officially resided in California at the time of his election as President; Buried in Iowa
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Born in Texas and raised in Kansas; Stationed all over the country and, later, around the world during his military career; Resident of New York at the time of his first election as President in 1952, but established Kansas as his official residence at the time of the 1956 Presidential election; Buried in Kansas
Richard Nixon: Born and raised in California; Represented California for the first half of his political career but moved to New York to join a law firm after losing the 1962 California gubernatorial campaign; New York was his official place of residence when elected President in 1968; Re-established California — the location of his “Western White House” — as his place of residency by the time of his re-election as President in 1972; Buried in California
Gerald Ford: Born in Nebraska and raised in Michigan; Represented Michigan throughout his political career; Buried in Michigan
Ronald Reagan: Born in Illinois; Represented California throughout his political career; Buried in California
George H.W. Bush: Born in Massachusetts; Represented Texas throughout his political career; Has arranged to be buried in Texas upon his death
George W. Bush: Born in Connecticut; Represented Texas throughout his political career; Planning to be buried in Texas upon his death
Barack Obama: Born in Hawaii; Represented Illinois throughout his political career

Asker anna8910 Asks:
I was doing my reading for my US History Class (I'm going back to college) and they said that the 1888 election between Cleveland and Harrison was one of the most corrupt elections in American History. Do you agree and if not which do you think was the most corrupt?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

No, I definitely disagree.  There were, of course. low-level dirty tricks in the 1888 campaign as there always are, and they were especially prevalent in the 19th Century, but the 1888 election was pretty tame.  Cleveland and Harrison were personally honest almost to a fault, and while they certainly wanted to win the election, neither would have permitted a dirty campaign or anything unseemly on their behalf.  In fact, longtime journalist Alexander K. McClure wrote of the 1888 election, “I cannot recall another Presidential contest that was conducted on both sides with greater dignity and decency than that between Cleveland and Harrison in 1888.”

The most corrupt election was probably the 1876 contest between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J. Tilden.  I don’t know where to begin with that election, but here’s quick overview:  

There were widespread allegations of voting irregularities, fraud, votes for sale, intimidation, and a bunch of other bad things alleged against both sides. Most of those allegations are almost certainly true.  
The results of the election were in dispute following Election Day, with three states still “counting” their votes: Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina.
•Those three states were controlled by the Republican Party as Reconstruction was still in effect in the South and the GOP was similar to an occupying force, with loyal Republicans installed in nearly every influential state, city, and county position.
•In what was either a major coincidence or an undoubtedly suspicious turn of events, the Republican-controlled states were having trouble counting their disputed votes at the exact moment when the Demcorat candidate, Samuel J. Tilden, not only led the Republican candidate (Hayes) in the popular vote, but also had a lead in the Electoral College.
•Tilden’s lead in the Electoral College was 184-166, and he was just one electoral vote away from clinching the Presidency.
•Of the three (Republican-controlled) states that were still in dispute, Tilden was leading in two of them.
•Again…Tilden just needed ONE more electoral vote to win the Presidency.  Hayes needed to win every single electoral vote still in dispute.
•Hayes caught a break in the two states where he was “trailing’ Tilden — Florida and Louisiana — when the Republican officials in charge of the process disqualified a significant amount of Tilden ballots.

•In the midst of the the confusion, as the election was being disputed, Tilden remained the favorite to pull off the victory.  Rutherford B. Hayes was actually convinced that he had lost the election.

For those of us who remember the anxiety and frustration over the 2000 election between George W. Bush and Al Gore, that was nothing compared to the 1876 election.  Election Day was on November 7, 1876, but the dispute dragged on so long that there were fears that the country might face violence or rebellion once a decision was finally made, especially since the country was only a dozen years removed from the Civil War.  Reconstruction was still taking place and Union troops continued to occupy the South.  Democratic candidates had been dominated by Republican candidates since the Civil War — many of whom were carpetbaggers from the North that native Southerners heavily resented.  The possibility of a Democrat seemingly being denied the Presidency easily could have sparked disturbances, especially since Samuel J. Tilden had won the popular vote and was denied an Electoral College majority through tactics which were questionable at best.  

Not only was the election in dispute, but when the Electoral College met, there were disputes about which Presidential electors could be certified. On top of all that, the Constitution requires Electoral College results to be counted before a joint session of Congress. The Senate was controlled by Democrats and the House was controlled by Republicans, so, of course, they couldn’t even come to an agreement about tallying the votes. Finally, Congress decided on an unprecedented alternative — the formation of a 15-member “Electoral Commission”. It was decided that there would be seven Democratic members, seven Republican members (including future President James Garfield), and one independent member — David Davis, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court and close friend of Abraham Lincoln. Unsurprisingly, even that didn’t go as planned — Davis retired from the Court and his spot on the Electoral Commission was filled by another Supreme Court Justice, Joseph P. Bradley. Justice Bradley was a Republican appointed by the Republican President Grant and his presence on the Commission gave the GOP an 8-7 advantage.

The Electoral Commission began its work on February 1, 1877. Now, don’t forget that the election had taken place on November 7, 1876, and the next President’s inauguration was scheduled for March 4, 1877. Since March 4th was a Sunday, the public inauguration ceremony would take place on Monday, March 5th. As you might imagine, the Electoral Commission’s decided the election strictly along party lines — 8-7 in favor of Rutherford B. Hayes. Justice Bradley, the Republican replacement for the Commission’s only independent appointee, was the swing vote.

The 2000 election was decided when the Supreme Court (voting along strict party lines just like in 1876) ended the recount of disputed votes in Florida. That happened on December 8, 2000 and the 43rd President’s Inauguration Day was January 20, 2001, not an ideal amount of time for a transition, but still well over a month. The 1876 election was officially decided by the Electoral Commission on March 2, 1877 — TWO DAYS before the 19th President’s Inauguration Day. Many Americans didn’t know who the new President was until after he was sworn in.

Although Tilden won the popular vote and probably won the Electoral vote, he did not dispute the election. It was said that Tilden recognized there was widespread voting fraud within his own organization and didn’t figured it was best to move on a spare the country any further trouble, especially since there was a real possibility of rebellion by opponents of Hayes and the Republicans. Tilden took solace in the fact that he (and many other Americans) knew he actually won the election.

Threats of major disturbances on Inauguration Day resulted in precautions being taken — on Saturday, March 3, 1877, President Grant invited Hayes to the White House and had the President-elect privately sworn into office in the Red Room, just in case anything prevented the actual ceremony. Because of how the election was decided (not to mention the fact that it had only been decided a couple of days earlier), the inauguration was low-key with no parades or inaugural balls. Once in office, President Hayes had to placate the Democrats who felt robbed of the election with what became known as the “Compromise of 1877”. Hayes basically ended Reconstruction by withdrawing the Union troops that had occupied the South since the end of the Civil War, a move which resulted in the “black codes” and ensured that civil rights for African-Americans were denied for nearly another century.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Do you think Jeb Bush is too moderate to get the republican nomination in 16?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

Not if the Republicans want to avoid another four years of Democratic control of the Executive Branch.  Moderates may have difficulty winning the GOP nomination, but not a single one of the Conservatives rumored to be considering Presidential bids in 2016 can win a national election.  The Electoral College favors moderates and the Electoral College is the only thing that matters in a Presidential election.  If the GOP nominates Rand Paul or Rick Perry, they might as well concede the election at the Republican National Convention because candidates like Paul and Perry can win a local election or a state election in certain parts of the country, but they can’t win 50 state elections taking place the same day throughout the nation — and that’s what a Presidential election is.  It’s not one big election; it’s 50 regional elections.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Might have been asked before: If the electoral college ties, the Presidential election goes to the House. What if the House has an even number of Republicans and Democrats and goes down the partisan middle?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

If no candidate receives the required majority in the Electoral College to become President and the election is sent to the House of Representatives, the first thing to understand is that the votes are not cast individually.  Instead, the vote is decided by state delegations (whose individual members of Congress vote as a block), and resolving the undecided election would require an absolute majority of states (at least 26) in order for a candidate to be elected.

So, to break it down more:  there are 435 individual members of the House of Representatives, but in the case of an undecided election of the President that is thrown into the House for a resolution, the members don’t cast individual votes.  Instead, they gather in their respective state delegations and cast their votes within their state’s caucus — the candidate who wins the majority of votes within the state delegation, “wins” that state.  Once a candidate wins an absolute majority of state delegations that candidate is elected President.

Now, there are, of course, 50 states, so what happens if the votes of the state delegations are split 25-25 and we still have no winner?  We simply take another ballot.  And, if necessary, another and another and another…  The voting in the House of Representatives continues on-and-on until a candidate finally wins a majority of state delegations.  It’s like a Papal Conclave — we must have a winner! —  without the world’s most low-tech method of excitement: the fumata bianca.

A few more important particulars to note if a Presidential election is thrown into the House of Representatives because nobody won a majority of Electoral votes:

•The House must choose between the leading Presidential candidates who received Electoral votes, they can’t just plug anyone that they want in there.  Of course, this is usually just two candidates.  However, the last time the election was decided by the House (1824), there were four candidates who split the Electoral vote: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay.  In such a case, the House is limited to deciding between the top three vote-getters in the original Electoral College tally.
•Advances in technology and transportation has all but eliminated the possibility of state delegations being absent from the proceedings, but it is mandatory for at least 2/3 of the state delegations to be present in order for the House to decide the election.
•All other Congressional business takes a backseat to an undecided Presidential election thrown into the House.  The House begins voting as quickly as possible and continues until there is a winner who qualifies.
•If we reach Inauguration Day and still don’t have a President-elect, the person who won an Electoral College majority as Vice President becomes President.  If there is also no Vice President-elect, the House how and who to choose the person who will become Acting President until somebody qualifies as President.  (An undecided Vice Presidential election is resolved by the U.S. Senate.)

The House of Representatives has decided two Presidential election — most famously the aforementioned 1824 election in which Andrew Jackson won a plurality of Electoral votes against John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, but lacked the required majority necessary to clinch the Presidency.  The House ended up electing John Quincy Adams, a result that Jackson and his supporters chalked up to a “Corrupt Bargain” between JQA and Henry Clay, who became Secretary of State under President Adams.  

The first election decided by the House was the 1800 campaign.  At the time, the top vote-getter in the Electoral College was elected President and the person who finished second was elected Vice President.  While there was no official designation between the Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates, going into the 1800 campaign, Democratic-Republicans unofficially saw Thomas Jefferson as the Presidential candidate and Aaron Burr as the Vice Presidential candidate.  When Jefferson and Burr ended up tied in the Electoral College, Burr saw an opportunity to snatch the Presidency up for himself, decided not to step aside for Jefferson, and the election was thrown into the House.  Alexander Hamilton, a Federalist leader, had issues with both Jefferson and Burr, but he hated Jefferson just a little bit less than Burr.  Hamilton influenced the Federalist support in Congress that Jefferson needed to clinch the Presidency and Burr ended up as Vice President.  As we all know, Burr never forgot Hamilton’s role in costing him the Presidency and he ended up killing Hamilton in a duel while still Vice President of the United States.

Incidentally, just in case anybody was wondering, a Vice Presidential election has only been thrown into the Senate for a decision on one occasion — 1836.  Richard Mentor Johnson had been a staunch supporter of Andrew Jackson and the outgoing President Jackson wanted to reward him.  While Jackson had almost seemingly handpicked Martin Van Buren as his chosen successor in 1836, Old Hickory definitely chose Johnson as the Democratic Vice Presidential candidate that year, insisting that the Democratic National Convention nominate Johnson as VP.  The Democrats nominated Johnson as Van Buren’s running mate, but Johnson was extremely unpopular in the South.  Despite being from Kentucky, Johnson openly kept a former slave as his common-law wife and raised their mixed-race children as white, free, and legitimate.  Many Southerners of his own party steadfastly refused to support Johnson’s candidacy for Vice President even as they supported Van Buren for President.  This led to four candidates splitting the vote for Vice President in the Electoral College — Richard M. Johnson, John Tyler, Francis Granger, and William Smith.  While Johnson had a solid plurality of Electoral votes for VP, he lacked the majority required for election that Van Buren had won as President.

In the case of a Presidential election deadlocked in the Electoral College, the House settles the dispute by a vote between the top three vote-getters, at most.  When a deadlocked Vice Presidential election is decided by the U.S. Senate, only the top two contenders in the Electoral College are considered.  So, the undecided election for Vice President in 1836 came down to Johnson and Granger, and Andrew Jackson was happy to see the Senate elect his choice for VP, Richard Mentor Johnson, to join his chosen successor as President, Martin Van Buren.

(Four years later, neither President Van Buren or Vice President Johnson were as lucky.  The Democrats renominated Van Buren, but Southerners were no longer the only opposition to the scandalous Richard Mentor Johnson.  At the Democratic Convention in 1840, Democrats refused to renominate Johnson, Van Buren refused to nominate another VP, and Van Buren headed into the general election season without a running mate.  Still hoping to continue in the job, Johnson simply campaigned for VP on his own and ended up as President Van Buren’s de facto running mate.  Johnson’s presence or absence had no discernible impact on the campaign — no matter who his running mate was, the incumbent President Van Buren was trounced on Election Day by Whig candidate William Henry Harrison.) 

Asker Anonymous Asks:
When does the electoral college meet to officially cast their votes for president and is that done at the capital building in Washington?
deadpresidents deadpresidents Said:

The Electoral College actually never gathers together for a meeting.  The Electors who American voters chose on Election Day last month will meet on December 17th in their respective state capitals.  The Electoral College meets to officially cast their votes on the first Monday after the second Wednesday of December following Election Day. 

While each state has their own process for the meeting of their Presidential Electors, they don’t differ all that dramatically.  There are various formalities and for the casting of the votes and some strict protocols for officially sending the votes to state officials and then to Congress, which officially counts and certifies the Electoral College results.  That takes place in a Joint Session of Congress in early January and that responsibility is one of the first major actions of the new Congress.  That means that, for the 2012 election, it will be the 113th Congress (which begins on January 3, 2013) instead of the 112th Congress (the Congress in office at the time of the 2012 election) which counts and officially certifies the Electoral College results.  In our case, that’s probably a good thing because if anybody could screw up counting the Electoral votes, it’s the abysmal 112th Congress.

Interestingly, it is usually the Vice President, in his Constitutional role as President of the Senate, who presides over the Joint Session and the certification of the Electoral College results.  Sometimes, that can lead to what must be an awkward and probably even somewhat heartbreaking experience of a Vice President presiding over the official certification of an election that he lost — something that has happened a few times recently: 1960 (Nixon, lost the Presidential election to Kennedy), 1968 (Humphrey, lost the Presidential election to Nixon), 1980 (Mondale, as Carter’s running mate), 1992 (Quayle, as Bush’s running mate), and, of course, 2000 (Gore, as famously seen in Fahrenheit 9/11.)

A listing of every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States, organized by overall total number of Presidential Electoral Votes received during career.

•1,876: Roosevelt, Franklin Delano (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York [1932; 1936; 1940; 1944]
•1,040: Nixon, Richard Milhous (1913-1994) | Republican | California [1960; 1968; 1972]
•1,015: Reagan, Ronald Wilson (1911-2004) | Republican | California [1976; 1980; 1984]
•899: Eisenhower, Dwight David (1890-1969) | Republican | New York [1952; 1956]
•749: Clinton, William Jefferson (1946-     ) | Democratic | Arkansas [1992; 1996]
•712: Wilson, (Thomas) Woodrow (1856-1924) | Democratic | New Jersey [1912; 1916]
•664: Cleveland, (Stephen) Grover (1837-1908) | Democratic | New York [1884; 1888; 1892]
•594: Bush, George Herbert Walker (1924-     ) | Republican | Texas [1988; 1992]
•563: McKinley, William (1843-1901) | Republican | Ohio [1896; 1900]
•556: Bush, George Walker (1946-     ) | Republican | Texas [2000; 2004]
•503: Hoover, Herbert Clark (1874-1964) | Republican | California [1928; 1932]
•500: Grant, Ulysses Simpson (1822-1885) | Republican | Illinois [1868; 1872]
•496: Jackson, Andrew (1767-1845) | Democratic-Republican, Democratic | Tennessee [1824; 1828; 1832]
•493: Bryan, William Jennings (1860-1925) | Democratic | Nebraska [1896; 1900; 1908]
•486: Johnson, Lyndon Baines (1908-1973) | Democratic | Texas [1964]
•424: Roosevelt, Theodore (1858-1919) | Republican, Progressive/Bull Moose | New York [1904; 1912]
•414: Monroe, James (1758-1831) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia [1816; 1820]
•404: Harding, Warren Gamaliel (1865-1923) | Republican | Ohio [1920]
•392: Lincoln, Abraham (1809-1865) | Republican | Illinois [1860; 1864]
•382: Coolidge, (John) Calvin (1872-1933) | Republican | Massachusetts [1924]
•378: Harrison, Benjamin (1833-1901) | Republican | Indiana [1888; 1892]
•365: Obama, Barack Hussein (1961-     ) | Democratic | Illinois [2008]
•346: Carter, Jimmy (1924-     ) | Democratic | Georgia [1976; 1980]
•329: Taft, William Howard (1857-1930) | Republican | Ohio [1908; 1912]
•307: Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia [1792; 1796; 1800; 1804]
•307: Harrison, William Henry (1773-1841) | Whig | Ohio [1836; 1840]
•303: Truman, Harry S. (1884-1972) | Democratic | Missouri [1948]
•303: Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (1917-1963) | Democratic | Massachusetts [1960]
•288: Dewey, Thomas Edmund (1902-1971) | Republican | New York [1944; 1948]
•266: Gore, Albert Arnold (1948-     ) | Democratic | Tennessee [2000]
•254: Pierce, Franklin (1804-1869) | Democratic | New Hampshire [1852]
•254: Hughes, Charles Evans (1862-1948) | Republican | New York [1916]
•251: Kerry, John Forbes (1943-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts [2004]
•250: Madison, James (1751-1836) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia [1808; 1812]
•247: Adams, John (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts [1789; 1792; 1796; 1800]
•240: Ford, Gerald Rudolph (1913-2006) | Republican | Michigan [1976]
•230: Van Buren, Martin (1782-1862) | Democratic | New York [1836; 1840]
•214: Garfield, James Abram (1831-1881) | Republican | Ohio [1880]
•203: Washington, George (1732-1799) | Federalist | Virginia [1789; 1792; 1796]
•191: Clay, Henry (1777-1852) | Democratic-Republican | Kentucky [1824; 1832; 1844]
•191: Humphrey, Hubert Horatio (1911-1978) | Democratic | Minnesota [1968]
•185: Hayes, Rutherford Birchard (1822-1893) | Republican | Ohio [1876]
•184: Tilden, Samuel Jones (1814-1886) | Democratic | New York [1876]
•182: Blaine, James Gillespie (1830-1893) | Republican | Maine [1884]
•174: Buchanan, James (1791-1868) | Democratic | Pennsylvania [1856]
•173: McCain, John Sidney (1936-     ) | Republican | Arizona [2008]
•170: Polk, James Knox (1795-1849) | Democratic | Tennessee [1844]
•168: Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts [1820; 1824; 1828]
•163: Taylor, Zachary (1784-1850) | Whig | Louisiana [1848]
•162: Stevenson, Adlai Ewing (1900-1965) | Democratic | Illinois [1952; 1956]
•159: Dole, Robert Joseph (1923-     ) | Republican | Kansas [1996]
•155: Hancock, Winfield Scott (1824-1886) | Democratic | Pennsylvania [1880]
•140: Parker, Alton Brooks (1852-1926) | Democratic | New York [1904]
•136: Davis, John William (1873-1955) | Democratic | West Virginia [1924]
•127: Cass, Lewis (1782-1866) | Democratic | Michigan [1848]
•127: Cox, James Middleton (1870-1957) | Democratic | Ohio [1920]
•126: Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina [1796; 1800; 1804; 1808]
•114: Frémont, John Charles (1813-1890) | Republican | California [1856]
•111: Dukakis, Michael Stanley (1933-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts [1988]
•104: Burr, Aaron (1756-1836) | Democratic-Republican | New York [1792; 1796; 1800]
•89: Clinton, DeWitt (1769-1828) | Federalist | New York [1812]
•87: Smith, Alfred Emanuel (1873-1944) | Democratic | New York [1928]
•82: Willkie, Wendell Lewis (1892-1944) | Republican | Indiana [1940]
•80: Seymour, Horatio (1810-1886) | Democratic | New York [1868]
•72: Breckinridge, John Cabell (1821-1875) | National Democrat | Kentucky [1860]
•66: Clinton, George (1739-1812) | Anti-Federalist, Democratic-Republican | New York [1789; 1792; 1796; 1808]
•59: Pinckney, Thomas (1750-1828) | Federalist | South Carolina [1796]
•52: Goldwater, Barry Morris (1909-1998) | Republican | Arizona [1964]
•46: Wallace, George Corley (1919-1998) | American Independent | Alabama 46  [1968]
•42: Scott, Winfield (1786-1866) | Whig | New Jersey [1852]
•42: Hendricks, Thomas Andrews (1819-1885) | Democratic | Indiana [1872]
•41: Crawford, William Harris (1772-1834) | Democratic-Republican | Georgia [1824]
•39: Bell, John (1796-1869) | Constitutional Union | Tennessee [1860]
•39: Thurmond, (James) Strom (1903-2003) | States’ Rights/Dixiecrat | South Carolina [1948]
•34: King, Rufus (1755-1827) | Federalist | New York [1816]
•26: White, Hugh Lawson (1773-1840) | Whig | Tennessee [1836]
•22: Weaver, James Baird (1833-1912) | Populist | Iowa [1892]
•21: McClellan, George Brinton (1826-1885) | Democratic | New Jersey [1864]
•18: Brown, Benjamin Gratz (1826-1885) | National Union Party | Missouri [1872]
•17: McGovern, George Stanley (1922-     ) | Democratic | South Dakota [1972]
•15: Adams, Samuel (1722-1803) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts [1796]
•15: Jay, John (1745-1829) | Federalist | New York [1789; 1796; 1800]
•14: Webster, Daniel (1782-1852) | Whig | Massachusetts [1836]
•13: LaFollette, Robert Marion, Sr. (1855-1925) | Progressive | Wisconsin [1924]
•13: Mondale, Walter Frederick (1928-     ) | Democratic | Minnesota [1984]
•12: Douglas, Stephen Arnold (1813-1861) | Democratic | Illinois [1860]
•11: Ellsworth, Oliver (1745-1807) | Federalist | Connecticut [1796]
•11: Floyd, John (1783-1837) | Independent Democrat/Nullifier | Virginia [1832]
•11: Mangum, Willie Person (1792-1861) | Whig | North Carolina [1836]
•8: Fillmore, Millard (1800-1874) | Whig, American/Know-Nothing | New York [1856]
•8: Landon, Alfred Mossman (1887-1987) | Republican | Kansas [1936]
•7: Wirt, William (1772-1834) | Anti-Masonic | Maryland [1832]
•6: Harrison, Robert Hanson (1745-1790) | Federalist | Maryland [1789]
•6: Rutledge, John (1739-1800) | Federalist | South Carolina [1789]
•4: Hancock, John (1737-1793) | Federalist | Massachusetts [1789]
•3: Iredell, James (1751-1799) | Federalist | North Carolina [1796]
•2: Huntington, Samuel (1731-1796) | Federalist | Connecticut [1789]
•2: Milton, John (1757-1817) | Federalist | Georgia [1789]
•2: Henry, John (1750-1798) | Democratic-Republican | Maryland [1796]
•2: Johnston, Samuel (1733-1816) | Federalist | North Carolina [1796]
•2: Jenkins, Charles Jones (1805-1883) | Democratic | Georgia [1872]
•1: Armstrong, James (1728-1800) | Federalist | Georgia [1789]
•1: Lincoln, Benjamin (1733-1810) | Federalist | Massachusetts [1789]
•1: Telfair, Edward (1735-1807) | Anti-Federalist | Georgia [1789]
•1: Davis, David (1815-1886) | Liberal Republican | Illinois [1872]
•1: Hospers, John (1918-2011) | Libertarian | California [1972]
•1: Bentsen, Lloyd Millard (1921-2006) | Democratic | Texas [1988]
•1: Edwards, John Reid (1953-     ) | Democratic | North Carolina [2004]

An alphabetical listing of every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States.

•Adams, John (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  247  [1789; 1792; 1796; 1800]
•Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts:  168  [1820; 1824; 1828]
•Adams, Samuel (1722-1803) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts:  15  [1796]
•Armstrong, James (1728-1800) | Federalist | Georgia:  1  [1789]
•Bell, John (1796-1869) | Constitutional Union | Tennessee:  39  [1860]
•Bentsen, Lloyd Millard (1921-2006) | Democratic | Texas:  1  [1988]
•Blaine, James Gillespie (1830-1893) | Republican | Maine:  182  [1884]
•Breckinridge, John Cabell (1821-1875) | National Democrat | Kentucky:  72  [1860]
•Brown, Benjamin Gratz (1826-1885) | National Union Party | Missouri:  18  [1872]
•Bryan, William Jennings (1860-1925) | Democratic | Nebraska:  493  [1896; 1900; 1908]
•Buchanan, James (1791-1868) | Democratic | Pennsylvania:  174  [1856]
•Burr, Aaron (1756-1836) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  104  [1792; 1796; 1800]
•Bush, George Herbert Walker (1924-     ) | Republican | Texas:  594  [1988; 1992]
•Bush, George Walker (1946-     ) | Republican | Texas:  556  [2000; 2004]
•Carter, Jimmy (1924-     ) | Democratic | Georgia:  346  [1976; 1980]
•Cass, Lewis (1782-1866) | Democratic | Michigan:  127  [1848]
•Clay, Henry (1777-1852) | Democratic-Republican | Kentucky:  191  [1824; 1832; 1844]
•Cleveland, (Stephen) Grover (1837-1908) | Democratic | New York:  664  [1884; 1888; 1892]
•Clinton, DeWitt (1769-1828) | Federalist | New York:  89  [1812]
•Clinton, George (1739-1812) | Anti-Federalist, Democratic-Republican | New York:  66  [1789; 1792; 1796; 1808]
•Clinton, William Jefferson (1946-     ) | Democratic | Arkansas:  749  [1992; 1996]
•Coolidge, (John) Calvin (1872-1933) | Republican | Massachusetts:  382  [1924]
•Cox, James Middleton (1870-1957) | Democratic | Ohio:  127  [1920]
•Crawford, William Harris (1772-1834) | Democratic-Republican | Georgia:  41  [1824]
•Davis, David (1815-1886) | Liberal Republican | Illinois:  1  [1872]
•Davis, John William (1873-1955) | Democratic | West Virginia:  136  [1924]
•Dewey, Thomas Edmund (1902-1971) | Republican | New York:  288  [1944; 1948]
•Dole, Robert Joseph (1923-     ) | Republican | Kansas:  159  [1996]
•Douglas, Stephen Arnold (1813-1861) | Democratic | Illinois:  12  [1860]
•Dukakis, Michael Stanley (1933-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  111  [1988]
•Edwards, John Reid (1953-     ) | Democratic | North Carolina:  1  [2004]
•Eisenhower, Dwight David (1890-1969) | Republican | New York:  899  [1952; 1956]
•Ellsworth, Oliver (1745-1807) | Federalist | Connecticut:  11  [1796]
•Fillmore, Millard (1800-1874) | Whig, American/Know-Nothing | New York:  8  [1856]
•Floyd, John (1783-1837) | Independent Democrat/Nullifier | Virginia:  11  [1832]
•Ford, Gerald Rudolph (1913-2006) | Republican | Michigan:  240  [1976]
•Frémont, John Charles (1813-1890) | Republican | California:  114  [1856]
•Garfield, James Abram (1831-1881) | Republican | Ohio:  214  [1880]
•Goldwater, Barry Morris (1909-1998) | Republican | Arizona:  52  [1964]
•Gore, Albert Arnold (1948-     ) | Democratic | Tennessee:  266  [2000]
•Grant, Ulysses Simpson (1822-1885) | Republican | Illinois:  500  [1868; 1872]
•Hancock, John (1737-1793) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  4  [1789]
•Hancock, Winfield Scott (1824-1886) | Democratic | Pennsylvania:  155  [1880]
•Harding, Warren Gamaliel (1865-1923) | Republican | Ohio:  404  [1920]
•Harrison, Benjamin (1833-1901) | Republican | Indiana:  378  [1888; 1892]
•Harrison, Robert Hanson (1745-1790) | Federalist | Maryland:  6  [1789]
•Harrison, William Henry (1773-1841) | Whig | Ohio:  307  [1836; 1840]
•Hayes, Rutherford Birchard (1822-1893) | Republican | Ohio:  185  [1876]
•Hendricks, Thomas Andrews (1819-1885) | Democratic | Indiana:  42  [1872]
•Henry, John (1750-1798) | Democratic-Republican | Maryland:  2  [1796]
•Hoover, Herbert Clark (1874-1964) | Republican | California:  503  [1928; 1932]
•Hospers, John (1918-2011) | Libertarian | California:  1  [1972]
•Hughes, Charles Evans (1862-1948) | Republican | New York:  254  [1916]
•Humphrey, Hubert Horatio (1911-1978) | Democratic | Minnesota:  191  [1968]
•Huntington, Samuel (1731-1796) | Federalist | Connecticut:  2  [1789]
•Iredell, James (1751-1799) | Federalist | North Carolina:  3  [1796]
•Jackson, Andrew (1767-1845) | Democratic-Republican, Democratic | Tennessee:  496  [1824; 1828; 1832]
•Jay, John (1745-1829) | Federalist | New York:  15  [1789; 1796; 1800]
•Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  307  [1792; 1796; 1800; 1804]
•Jenkins, Charles Jones (1805-1883) | Democratic | Georgia:  2  [1872]
•Johnson, Lyndon Baines (1908-1973) | Democratic | Texas:  486  [1964]
•Johnston, Samuel (1733-1816) | Federalist | North Carolina:  2  [1796]
•Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (1917-1963) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  303  [1960]
•Kerry, John Forbes (1943-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  251  [2004]
•King, Rufus (1755-1827) | Federalist | New York:  34  [1816]
•LaFollette, Robert Marion, Sr. (1855-1925) | Progressive | Wisconsin:  13  [1924]
•Landon, Alfred Mossman (1887-1987) | Republican | Kansas:  8  [1936]
•Lincoln, Abraham (1809-1865) | Republican | Illinois:  392  [1860; 1864]
•Lincoln, Benjamin (1733-1810) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  1  [1789]
•Madison, James (1751-1836) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  250  [1808; 1812]
•Mangum, Willie Person (1792-1861) | Whig | North Carolina:  11  [1836]
•McCain, John Sidney (1936-     ) | Republican | Arizona:  173  [2008]
•McClellan, George Brinton (1826-1885) | Democratic | New Jersey:  21  [1864]
•McGovern, George Stanley (1922-     ) | Democratic | South Dakota:  17  [1972]
•McKinley, William (1843-1901) | Republican | Ohio:  563  [1896; 1900]
•Milton, John (1757-1817) | Federalist | Georgia:  2  [1789]
•Mondale, Walter Frederick (1928-     ) | Democratic | Minnesota:  13  [1984]
•Monroe, James (1758-1831) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  414  [1816; 1820]
•Nixon, Richard Milhous (1913-1994) | Republican | California:  1,040  [1960; 1968; 1972]
•Obama, Barack Hussein (1961-     ) | Democratic | Illinois:  365  [2008]
•Parker, Alton Brooks (1852-1926) | Democratic | New York:  140  [1904]
•Pierce, Franklin (1804-1869) | Democratic | New Hampshire:  254  [1852]
•Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina:  126  [1796; 1800; 1804; 1808]
•Pinckney, Thomas (1750-1828) | Federalist | South Carolina:  59  [1796]
•Polk, James Knox (1795-1849) | Democratic | Tennessee:  170  [1844]
•Reagan, Ronald Wilson (1911-2004) | Republican | California:  1,015  [1976; 1980; 1984]
•Roosevelt, Franklin Delano (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York:  1,876  [1932; 1936; 1940; 1944]
•Roosevelt, Theodore (1858-1919) | Republican, Progressive/Bull Moose | New York:  424  [1904; 1912]
•Rutledge, John (1739-1800) | Federalist | South Carolina: 6  [1789]
•Scott, Winfield (1786-1866) | Whig | New Jersey:  42  [1852]
•Seymour, Horatio (1810-1886) | Democratic | New York:  80  [1868]
•Smith, Alfred Emanuel (1873-1944) | Democratic | New York:  87  [1928]
•Stevenson, Adlai Ewing (1900-1965) | Democratic | Illinois:  162  [1952; 1956]
•Taft, William Howard (1857-1930) | Republican | Ohio:  329  [1908; 1912]
•Taylor, Zachary (1784-1850) | Whig | Louisiana:  163  [1848]
•Telfair, Edward (1735-1807) | Anti-Federalist | Georgia:  1  [1789]
•Thurmond, (James) Strom (1903-2003) | States’ Rights/Dixiecrat | South Carolina:  39  [1948]
•Tilden, Samuel Jones (1814-1886) | Democratic | New York:  184  [1876]
•Truman, Harry S. (1884-1972) | Democratic | Missouri:  303  [1948]
•Van Buren, Martin (1782-1862) | Democratic | New York:  230  [1836; 1840]
•Wallace, George Corley (1919-1998) | American Independent | Alabama:  46  [1968]
•Washington, George (1732-1799) | Federalist | Virginia:  203  [1789; 1792; 1796]
•Weaver, James Baird (1833-1912) | Populist | Iowa:  22  [1892]
•Webster, Daniel (1782-1852) | Whig | Massachusetts:  14  [1836]
•White, Hugh Lawson (1773-1840) | Whig | Tennessee:  26  [1836]
•Willkie, Wendell Lewis (1892-1944) | Republican | Indiana:  82  [1940]
•Wilson, (Thomas) Woodrow (1856-1924) | Democratic | New Jersey:  712  [1912; 1916]
•Wirt, William (1772-1834) | Anti-Masonic | Maryland:  7  [1832]

Here is Part IV (1960-Present) of a look at every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States.

1960
•John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  303
•Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) | Republican | California:  219

1964
•Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973) | Democratic | Texas:  486
•Barry Morris Goldwater (1909-1998) | Republican | Arizona:  52

1968
•Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) | Republican | California:  301
•Hubert Horatio Humphrey (1911-1978) | Democratic | Minnesota:  191
•George Corley Wallace (1919-1998) | American Independent | Alabama:  46

1972
•Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) | Republican | California:  520
•George Stanley McGovern (1922-     ) | Democratic | South Dakota:  17
•John Hospers (1918-2011) | Libertarian | California:  1  (Received the vote of a faithless elector)

1976
•Jimmy Carter (1924-     ) | Democratic | Georgia:  297
•Gerald Rudolph Ford (1913-2006) | Republican | Michigan:  240
•Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) | Republican | California:  1  (Recieved the vote of a faithless elector)

1980
•Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) | Republican | California:  489
•Jimmy Carter (1924-     ) | Democratic | Georgia:  49

1984
•Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) | Republican | California:  525
•Walter Frederick Mondale (1928-     ) | Democratic | Minnesota:  13

1988
•George Herbert Walker Bush (1924-     ) | Republican | Texas:  426
•Michael Stanley Dukakis (1933-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  111
•Lloyd Millard Bentsen (1921-2006) | Democratic | Texas:  1 (Received the vote of a faithless elector)

1992
•William Jefferson Clinton (1946-     ) | Democratic | Arkansas:  370
•George Herbert Walker Bush (1924-     ) | Republican | Texas:  168

1996
•William Jefferson Clinton (1946-     ) | Democratic | Arkansas:  379
•Robert Joseph Dole (1923-     ) | Republican | Kansas:  159

2000
•George Walker Bush (1946-     ) | Republican | Texas:  271
•Albert Arnold Gore (1948-     ) | Democratic | Tennessee:  266

2004
•George Walker Bush (1946-     ) | Republican | Texas:  286
•John Forbes Kerry (1943-     ) | Democratic | Massachusetts:  251
•John Reid Edwards (1953-     ) | Democratic | North Carolina:  1  (Received the vote of a faithless elector)

2008
•Barack Hussein Obama (1961-     ) | Democratic | Illinois:  365
•John Sidney McCain (1936-     ) | Republican | Arizona:  173

2012
Barack Hussein Obama (1961-     ) | Democratic | Illinois vs. (Willard) Mitt Romney (1947-     ) | Republican | Massachusetts

Here is Part III (1904-1956) of a look at every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States.

1904
•Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) | Republican | New York:  336
•Alton Brooks Parker (1852-1926) | Democratic | New York:  140

1908
•William Howard Taft (1857-1930) | Republican | Ohio:  321
•William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) | Democratic | Nebraska:  162

1912
•(Thomas) Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) | Democratic | New Jersey:  435
•Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) | Progressive/Bull Moose | New York:  88
•William Howard Taft (1857-1930) | Republican | Ohio:  8

1916
•(Thomas) Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) | Democratic | New Jersey:  277
•Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948) | Republican | New York:  254

1920
•Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) | Republican | Ohio:  404
•James Middleton Cox (1870-1957) | Democratic | Ohio:  127

1924
•(John) Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933) | Republican | Massachusetts:  382
•John William Davis (1873-1955) | Democratic | West Virginia:  136
•Robert Marion LaFollette, Sr. (1855-1925) | Progressive | Wisconsin:  13

1928
•Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) | Republican | California:  444
•Alfred Emanuel Smith (1873-1944) | Democratic | New York:  87

1932
•Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York:  472
•Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) | Republican | California:  59

1936
•Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York:  523
•Alfred Mossman Landon (1887-1987) | Republican | Kansas:  8

1940
•Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York:  449
•Wendell Lewis Willkie (1892-1944) | Republican | Indiana:  82

1944
•Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) | Democratic | New York:  432
•Thomas Edmund Dewey (1902-1971) | Republican | New York:  99

1948
•Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) | Democratic | Missouri:  303
•Thomas Edmund Dewey (1902-1971) | Republican | New York:  189
•(James) Strom Thurmond (1903-2003) | States’ Rights/Dixiecrat | South Carolina:  39

1952
•Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) | Republican | New York:  442
•Adlai Ewing Stevenson (1900-1965) | Democratic | Illinois:  89

1956
•Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) | Republican | New York:  457
•Adlai Ewing Stevenson (1900-1965) | Democratic | Illinois:  73

Here is Part II (1860-1900) of a look at every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States.

1860
•Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) | Republican | Illinois:  180
•John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) | National Democrat | Kentucky:  72
•John Bell (1796-1869) | Constitutional Union | Tennessee:  39
•Stephen Arnold Douglas (1813-1861) | Democratic | Illinois:  12

1864
•Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) | Republican | Illinois:  212
•George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885) | Democratic | New Jersey:  21

1868
•Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) | Republican | Illinois:  214
•Horatio Seymour (1810-1886) | Democratic | New York:  80

1872
•Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) | Republican | Illinois:  286
•Horace Greeley (1811-1872) | Liberal Republican | New York:  66
Horace Greeley died after the general election but before the meeting of the Electoral College, so the 66 Electoral votes that he would have been awarded were divided to the following candidates:
•Thomas Andrews Hendricks (1819-1885) | Democratic | Indiana:  42 
•Benjamin Gratz Brown (1826-1885) | National Union Party | Missouri:  18
•Charles Jones Jenkins (1805-1883) } Democratic | Georgia:  2
•David Davis (1815-1886) | Liberal Republican | Illinois:  1
•3 Electoral votes awarded to Greeley were not counted by Congress due to Greeley’s death

1876
•Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893) | Republican | Ohio:  185
•Samuel Jones Tilden (1814-1886) | Democratic | New York:  184

1880
•James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) | Republican | Ohio:  214
•Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886) | Democratic | Pennsylvania:  155

1884
•(Stephen) Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) | Democratic | New York:  219
•James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893) | Republican | Maine:  182

1888
•Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901) | Republican | Indiana:  233
•(Stephen) Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) | Democratic | New York:  168

1892
•(Stephen) Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) | Democratic | New York:  277
•Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901) | Republican | Indiana:  145
•James Baird Weaver (1833-1912) | Populist | Iowa:  22

1896
•William McKinley (1843-1901) | Republican | Ohio:  271
•William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) | Democratic | Nebraska: 176

1900
•William McKinley (1843-1901) | Republican | Ohio:  292
•William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) | Democratic | Nebraska:  155

Here is Part I (1789-1856) of a look at every person in American history who has received an Electoral Vote for President of the United States.

1789
•George Washington (1732-1799) | Federalist | Virginia:  69
•John Adams (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  34
•John Jay (1745-1829) | Federalist | New York:  9
•Robert Hanson Harrison (1745-1790) | Federalist | Maryland:  6
•John Rutledge (1739-1800) | Federalist | South Carolina:  6
•John Hancock (1737-1793) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  4
•George Clinton (1739-1812) | Anti-Federalist | New York:  3
•Samuel Huntington (1731-1796) | Federalist | Connecticut:  2
•John Milton (1757-1817) | Federalist | Georgia:  2
•James Armstrong (1728-1800) | Federalist | Georgia:  1
•Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  1
•Edward Telfair (1735-1807) | Anti-Federalist | Georgia:  1

1792
•George Washington (1732-1799) | Federalist | Virginia:  132
•John Adams (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  77
•George Clinton (1739-1812) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  50
•Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  4
•Aaron Burr (1756-1836) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  1

1796
•John Adams (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  71
•Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  68
•Thomas Pinckney (1750-1828) | Federalist | South Carolina:  59
•Aaron Burr (1756-1836) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  30
•Samuel Adams (1722-1803) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts:  15
•Oliver Ellsworth (1745-1807) | Federalist | Connecticut:  11
•George Clinton (1739-1812) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  7
•John Jay (1745-1829) | Federalist | New York:  5
•James Iredell (1751-1799) | Federalist | North Carolina:  3
•Samuel Johnston (1733-1816) | Federalist | North Carolina:  2
•John Henry (1750-1798) | Democratic-Republican | Maryland:  2
•George Washington (1732-1799) | Federalist | Virginia:  2
•Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina:  1

1800
•Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  73
•Aaron Burr (1756-1836) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  73
•John Adams (1735-1826) | Federalist | Massachusetts:  65
•Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina:  64
•John Jay (1745-1829) | Federalist | New York:  1

1804
•Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  162
•Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina:  14

1808
•James Madison (1751-1836) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  122
•Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746-1825) | Federalist | South Carolina:  47
•George Clinton (1739-1812) | Democratic-Republican | New York:  6

1812
•James Madison (1751-1836) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  128
•DeWitt Clinton (1769-1828) | Federalist | New York:  89

1816
•James Monroe (1758-1831) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  183
•Rufus King (1755-1827) | Federalist | New York:  34

1820
•James Monroe (1758-1831) | Democratic-Republican | Virginia:  231
•John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts:  1

1824
(No candidate received the requisite number of Electoral Votes for victory, so the election was decided in favor of John Quincy Adams by the U.S. House of Representatives)
•Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) | Democratic-Republican | Tennessee:  99
•John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) | Democratic-Republican | Massachusetts:  84
•William Harris Crawford (1772-1834) | Democratic-Republican | Georgia:  41
•Henry Clay (1777-1852) | Democratic-Republican | Kentucky:  37

1828
•Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) | Democratic | Tennessee:  178
•John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) | National Republican | Massachusetts:  83

1832
•Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) | Democratic | Tennessee:  219
•Henry Clay (1777=1852) | National Republican | Kentucky:  49
•John Floyd (1783-1837) | Independent Democrat/Nullifier | Virginia:  11
•William Wirt (1772-1834) | Anti-Masonic | Maryland:  7

1836
•Martin Van Buren (1782-1862) | Democratic | New York:  170
•William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) | Whig | Ohio:  73
•Hugh Lawson White (1773-1840) | Whig | Tennessee:  26
•Daniel Webster (1782-1852) | Whig | Massachusetts:  14
•Willie Person Mangum (1792-1861) | Whig | North Carolina:  11

1840
•William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) | Whig | Ohio:  234
•Martin Van Buren (1782-1862) | Democratic | New York:  60

1844
•James Knox Polk (1795-1849) | Democratic | Tennessee:  170
•Henry Clay (1777-1852) | Whig | Kentucky:  105

1848
•Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) | Whig | Louisiana:  163
•Lewis Cass (1782-1866) | Democratic | Michigan:  127

1852
•Franklin Pierce (1804-1869) | Democratic | New Hampshire:  254
•Winfield Scott (1786-1866) | Whig | New Jersey:  42

1856
•James Buchanan (1791-1868) | Democratic | Pennsylvania:  174
•John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) | Republican | California:  114
•Millard Fillmore (1800-1874) | American/Know-Nothing | New York:  8